Observation 107737: Limacella “sp-L-IL01”
When: 2012-08-28
Herbarium specimen reported

Images

256774
256815
256853
Are these the type of cells I am looking for in the stipe? I dont see too many reference photos anywhere.

Proposed Names

-57% (2)
Recognized by sight
30% (2)
Recognized by sight
30% (2)
Eye3
Recognized by sight
ret
54% (1)
Based on microscopic features: see comments
ret
81% (1)
Eyes3
Based on chemical features: nrLSU sequence and comparison to sequences of Illinois collections. See http://www.amanitaceae.org?Limacella%20sp-L-IL01

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
The sequence should be public in about a week.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2016-11-15 05:30:13 AEDT (+1100)

The GB accession number is KX827619.

Thanks again for your generosity.

Very best,

Rod

nrITS sequence deposited in GenBank
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2016-09-09 07:58:13 AEST (+1000)

It will be awhile before the sequence is posted for publish access; however, the process has begun.

Very best,

Rod

This taxon has been designated (temporarily)…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2016-09-08 03:23:37 AEST (+1000)

Limacella sp-L-IL01 cryptonom. temp. It is apparently an indigenous North American species. An LSU sequence is being posted today to GenBank.

Very best,

Rod

Genetic comparison with a GenBank sequence identifed as coming from glioderma.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-11-06 16:53:21 AEDT (+1100)

The sole glioderma nrLSU sequence in GenBank is quite distinct from the two sequences of the same locus that Dr. Geml sent to me from Illinois and Indiana collections of the species represented here. I don’t think that this taxon is the European glioderma.

Very best,

Rod

It turned out that all of the U.S. material I was able to get
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-11-06 16:10:45 AEDT (+1100)

… from sect. Limacella belongs to a single species.

Since I am still sorting out taxa in Limacella, I just combined the data temporarily under one of the old temporary names that had its data fields well populated. You can now see photos of the species at three different stages of growth. The page needs a lot of work. There should be text concerning the change in appearance of the cap with age, etc.

Having some internet troubles today. Thanks, comcast. I hope this gets through.

Very best,

Rod

Thank you again, Steve.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-11-06 07:16:41 AEDT (+1100)

Dr. Geml sent us a batch of sequences from limacellas last week, and this collection was among them. We’re not finished going through the treasure trove, but this looks like the only sequence we got back from Limacella sect. Limacella. Maybe folks are more likely to recognize a Limacella if the stipe is gooey as well as the cap.

The species depicted in this observation is one of the so-called “dry stemmed” species. Our sample size is not large for either of the dry-stemmed sections. We’ve gotten a lot of “wet-stemmed” limacellas from the Americas. The number of temporary codes will definitely drop when this exercise is over.

You and other MO participants really produced some good samples.

Thanks again.

Very best,

Rod

That would be great.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2013-05-30 10:43:39 AEST (+1000)

Thanks, Steve.

R

I know just where these were
By: Stephen Russell (Mycota)
2013-05-30 09:49:20 AEST (+1000)

and can make a return trip this year to see if they reappear…

Posted very minimally on WAO.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2013-05-30 06:49:12 AEST (+1000)
Thank you, Steve.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2013-05-30 04:39:41 AEST (+1000)

This material is accessioned and is scheduled for sampling.

Very best,

Rod

A quick review of the material. 2nd EDIT The spores are not decorated…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2013-05-30 04:35:01 AEST (+1000)

(used Nomarski differential interference contrast at 1250 X) and are of the size already described by Steve.

There are plentiful clamps, and the hyphae of the stipe are of rather significantly varying width (about 2 – 13 microns) and the broadest have slightly thickened walls. There appeared to be a few vascular hyphae in the stipe context…at least I saw the typical blobs of the content from broken vascular hyphae. It is very hard to identify acrophysalides in the tissue because they are not much broader than the hyphae from which they arise (and, as in the case of the hyphae, those of broadest diameter sometimes have similarly thickened walls). The largest acrophysalide seen by Cristina was 284 × 17.5 microns.

The pileus surface is covered by a layer of gluten (the surface of which is covered with the tiny spores). Below the surface there are the remains of what were quite probably the typical gluten retaining hyphae of a Limacella. The thickness of the gluten is 25 – 35 microns in the dried material, but the tissue seems to have been damaged by aging before drying; therefore, the gluten was probably thicker in fresh mature material. The terminal cells of the gluten retaining hyphae (when they are not decayed away) are short and subcylindric as is illustrated for a number of species of section Limacella by Neville and Poumarat (Amaniteae, 2004).

The lamella trama is divergent, and the gill edge is fertile and lacking cystidia.

So we can agree that this is something close to L. glioderma; but can’t be sure what it is.

Also, because of the condition of the specimen, we can’t be sure that we are describing typical tissue.

Thanks to Cristina Rodriguez for going over the stipe tissue with me and for doing the microscopy on the lamella trama.

I think this experience suggests that it is necessary to get Limacella to the dryer quickly and dry them quickly just as in the case of Amanita. It will be very interesting to see if DNA can tell us anything about this collection in comparison to the European taxa of sect. Limacella.

Very best,

Rod

Yes.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2012-08-31 10:49:42 AEST (+1000)

My experience is almost entirely with dried specimens as far as Limacella goes. Even the specimens I collected were dried before I examined them. The layer of slime will reconstitute in mounting fluids like very dilute KOH solution or dilute ammonium hydroxide and so will the hyphae…although they will often be quite collapsed.

Very best,

Rod

Would the vertical cap surface hyphae still be apparent in a dried specimen?
By: Stephen Russell (Mycota)
2012-08-31 03:49:29 AEST (+1000)
For the stipe tissue and the cap surface…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2012-08-31 02:56:57 AEST (+1000)

Try picking-pulling your section apart with fine pins. This can help you see the long clavate terminal cells (acrophysalides). Another thing that you should see in all species of Limacella is a lot of clamp connections at the septa of the hyphae. This is especially noticeable in the slime-retaining hyphae on the cap surface.

With regard to those slime-retaining hyphae, a scalp view of the cap surface (cut very thin so that light passes through it) would show these special purpose hyphae from the top down. Some would look like small circles (2-4 microns wide or a little more or less), others would be falling over from the mechanical damage caused by sectioning or the drying of the slime layer. A very thin slice radially through the cap context and the surface layer(s) of the Limacella or something else, would show rather closely packed upright thin hyphae or the same hyphae tilting this way and that due to collapse from the sectioning or from natural drying, etc. I have always found that the slime retaining hyphae have clamps at nearly every septum.

Christine Braaten seems to have a light touch with the razor or scalpel. I do not usually get as thin a section as she did; consequently I see a lot more densely packed hyphae and a more cluttered image.

If you can get a photo of what you see of the cap surface, post it; and we may get other comments from folks who take a look at it.

Rod

Having trouble with the scopework
By: Stephen Russell (Mycota)
2012-08-31 02:25:12 AEST (+1000)

I surely havent seen a nice layer of slime hyphae as in that picture. So I took out glischra and dont really see it there either…

Also fairly unconfident about the stipe tissue hyphae as well.

I suggest checking the surface of the cap under the scope.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2012-08-30 22:47:40 AEST (+1000)

Limacella would have stipe tissue like that of an Amanita and a cap surface of pretty much vertically oriented thin hyphae in the matrix of slime.

See the photos of Christine Braaten on MO #101796.

R

Spores are 3-4 microns
By: Stephen Russell (Mycota)
2012-08-30 14:54:52 AEST (+1000)

and globose so the evidence is building.

Would key out to glioderma
By: Stephen Russell (Mycota)
2012-08-30 14:30:27 AEST (+1000)

according to Kuo. Not much info on RET’s site. Looks close to the pic from Sweden though. Kuo found it in central IL. Would be nice to have 2 Limacella species in one day.

Strong smell of cucumber
By: Stephen Russell (Mycota)
2012-08-30 13:56:20 AEST (+1000)

Created: 2012-08-30 11:34:01 AEST (+1000)
Last modified: 2016-09-08 03:25:46 AEST (+1000)
Viewed: 212 times, last viewed: 2016-12-09 01:27:55 AEDT (+1100)
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