Observation 109627: Cantharellus cibarius var. laganum
When: 2012-08-04
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Delivered by someone who ~found this ~growing indoors.

Proposed Names

-30% (3)
Recognized by sight: Canthareellus sensu lato – Cantharellus sweetus toothii.
-4% (2)
Eyes3
Used references: Horace Serm. I. 6. 115 and the History of the Word Laganum
B. L. Ullman
Classical Philology , Vol. 7, No. 4 (Oct., 1912), pp. 442-449

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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substrate
By: Sam.Schaperow (SamSchaperow)
2012-09-16 06:44:31 AEST (+1000)

I think the primary component of these Cantharellus (or are they just lookalikes?) is sugar, and/or butter. Its substrate may be laganum, but if that is only the substrate, I’d think it wouldn’t appear in the name, just as we don’t call shiitake by the wood it grows in. Though, we do have mushrooms we label based on the wood they grow on (though not as a “var”, but rather to the species when unique to that wood). An example, though mycorhizal, is Boletus huronensis. Now, I do believe cane sugar is a component of what is in the substrate (this would be analogous to mycelium w/in wood it inhabits).

Horace Serm. I. 6. 115 and the History of the Word Laganum
By: Patrick Harvey (pg_harvey)
2012-09-15 02:25:03 AEST (+1000)

Horace Serm. I. 6. 115 and the History of the Word Laganum
B. L. Ullman
Classical Philology , Vol. 7, No. 4 (Oct., 1912), pp. 442-449

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/261474

443:

… but for laganum, as used in the Horatian

passage, we find the following meanings: Harper’s Dictionary calls
it a “kind of cake made of flour and oil,” while various editions call
it pancake or fritter. Of the Germans, Kiessling translates " Plinsen"
(fritter); Orelli-Mewes (1892) “Plinsen, Pfannkuchen”; Saalfeld,2
“Ein diinner Olkuchen, Olplatz, in 01 gebackene Plinse, als Speise
fulr Armere.}” In his “Haus und Hof” (p. 82) the same author calls
it “Pfannkuchen, ein diinner Olkuchen, eine Olplinse, von Armeren
zur Speise gewaihlt.”

P. 445:

“Laganon” is still used in modern Greek to mean “a sheet of
paste, a kind of pastry; sweet cake” (Contopoulos, Greek-
English Lexicon, 5th ed., 1903); “hearth-cake” (Kyriakides,
Modern Greek-English Dictionary, 1909); “Kuchen und Blatterteig”
(Mitsotakis inLangenscheidt’s Taschenw6rterbiicher1, 905).

Created: 2012-09-14 10:18:30 AEST (+1000)
Last modified: 2012-09-16 02:45:58 AEST (+1000)
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