Observation 112002: Caloplaca diphyodes (Nyl.) Jatta
When: 2012-10-02
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: on Si rock in intermittently inundated small rivulet; with Staurothele fissa

McCune comments “…the distinctive morphology of the North American streamside material suggests that there is justification for continuing to use a name other than C. atroalba for the semi-aquatic species in North America. In contrast C. atroalba typically occurs in dry, exposed habitats”

Images

268048
lichen is 3cm across
268049
note fimbriate prothallus
268050
KOH
268051
KOH
268052
KOH
268053
KOH
268054
KOHthese may be a bit immature as for some others the isthmus was very thin

Proposed Names

55% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Used references: Bruce McCune’s key Caloplaca in Pacific Northwest, Revised July 2011 at http://people.oregonstate.edu/~mccuneb/Caloplaca.pdf;
Thomson, J.W. (1997) American Arctic Lichens, 2. The Microlichens
Based on microscopic features: hymenium ca. 100u; hypothecium ca. 100u; spores average 19×9u, septum 3 or 4u; paraphyses ca. 2u diameter, ca. 5u at apices;
Based on chemical features: K neg, pol neg; lack of chemistry unusual for Caloplaca – perhaps Jason can suggest an alternative

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Looks like you have the right ID
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2012-10-07 01:16:34 BST (+0100)

at least based on my reading of McCune’s key. Maybe you’re right about it being easy to overlook. But there are plenty of workers who delight in black button crusts; there are far less conspicuous members of that… um… “elite” group of lichens. It’s always possible that you just have a good eye for interesting things, you know… :)

interesting
By: Richard Droker (wanderflechten)
2012-10-07 00:14:27 BST (+0100)

My feeling was that this seems so easy to ignore in the field, as it isn’t colorful, etc. Sort of like Leptogium rivale, which I seem to find in the Cascades mostly when I’m consciously looking for it. Given what you say I should try to confirm the identification of C. diphyodes though.

I don’t think it’s that common
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2012-10-06 06:08:39 BST (+0100)

Only 12 US and Canadian records on CNALH. Kristinsson has reported it a few times for the arctic, Debolt from Glacier N.P., and Weber in the Colorado catalog. Probably a few other sources I haven’t done yet, too, but you get the picture. Compare to C. impolita, for example, hardly a common species and fairly restricted to the southwest, but it is reported from 15 checklists (at least) and 158 records on CNALH.

common?
By: Richard Droker (wanderflechten)
2012-10-05 16:20:24 BST (+0100)

Thanks Jason

Thinking this might be relatively common so I’ll be watching for it in similar habitat.

Very neat!
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2012-10-02 20:11:43 BST (+0100)

Always wanted to see one of the black Caloplaca. Well done!

Created: 2012-10-02 19:04:48 BST (+0100)
Last modified: 2012-10-02 19:12:22 BST (+0100)
Viewed: 67 times, last viewed: 2016-10-24 16:04:03 BST (+0100)
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