Observation 113946: Hymenopellis
When: 2012-10-20
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Please help w/the ID, including the species, & including that both of these are the same species (didn’t get the “root” on one…). Thank you.!

Proposed Names

55% (1)
Recognized by sight
85% (3)
Recognized by sight

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus


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By: Sam.Schaperow (SamSchaperow)
2012-10-21 20:50:53 PDT (-0700)

Hi Daniel:

The broken one, I don’t know if a family member gave it to me or not (it wasn’t very recent, but has preserved well in the fridge, though I should have noted that, anyway, even though it looks sufficiently fresh). So, perhaps it was pulled out w/o any care. The other one w/the showing of rooting was found and photoed the day the ob. is listed as.

Now, as for the radicata idea. Here’s my thinking:
Radicata, or at least the East Coast version, has scales/fibers on the above ground stipe, whereas furfuracea doesn’t. http://mushroomobserver.org/image/show_image/267593?q=mUEa&size=full_size shows a radicata I recently found only ~80’ away from this one near an old maple stump. This one is by another probably very old stump of unknown type, though w/o good evidence I somehow have suspected a conifer (probably just because a conifer is nearest to this area). Anyway, comparing this ob. to the other, I’d remain quite confident on it being furfuracea.

TY for the suggestion, as it got me delving deeper in the the distinction btwn. the two.

Did you consider Oudemansiella radicata, Sam?
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2012-10-21 10:22:36 PDT (-0700)

The stipe is brittle, which would explain its absence. Usually associated with beech.

Created: 2012-10-20 14:53:31 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2013-01-23 09:08:23 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 64 times, last viewed: 2016-10-23 21:34:07 PDT (-0700)
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