Observation 114219: Gyroporus castaneus (Bull.) Quél.
When: 2012-10-22
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: Found these “boletes” growing in the flower bed in the front of my yard. The flower bed has lavender and wild grasses and is mulched with unknown woods (previous owner of the house put it in). There is a pepper tree nearby. The area gets frequent watering.

First noticed these about 3 months ago, then got a nice patch 5 days ago. They do not stain blue. Other than that, they resemble a butter bolete, but are more yellowish.

I’ve heard that these are rare in California so it’d be great to get a positive ID.

-Nick

Images

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275244
This is the pepper tree near the supposed Chestnut Boletes. In the picture with the house, the boletes were found behind the tree, by the wooden fence in front of the patio where some smaller plants grow in woodchips.
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This is the pepper tree near the supposed Chestnut Boletes. In the picture with the house, the boletes were found behind the tree, by the wooden fence in front of the patio where some smaller plants grow in woodchips.
275246
This is the pepper tree near the supposed Chestnut Boletes. In the picture with the house, the boletes were found behind the tree, by the wooden fence in front of the patio where some smaller plants grow in woodchips.
275247
This is the pepper tree near the supposed Chestnut Boletes. In the picture with the house, the boletes were found behind the tree, by the wooden fence in front of the patio where some smaller plants grow in woodchips.
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Pepper tree
275252
Pepper tree

Proposed Names

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
I just looked at obs 190644
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2016-05-20 21:05:22 PDT (-0700)

I’ll leave a comment for this observation.

Dave,
By: I. G. Safonov (IGSafonov)
2016-05-20 20:58:59 PDT (-0700)

what do you think about obs 190644?

One of the key features for Gyroporus…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2016-05-20 20:46:17 PDT (-0700)

is that the stipe snaps apart like a piece of chalk (similar to many Russula species). Like Christian said, stipe becomes hollow. When young the stipe features a central cavity that’s stuffed with a pithy context, contrasting the brittle outer layer. The one photo here of the cut/broken stipe appears to show this type of variable context within the stipe.

Here in eastern NA G. castaneus is generally associated with oak. But I have found them in places where there’s absolutely no oak. I once found a large fruiting in the Green Mountains of northern Vermont (no oak) under a massive beech tree.

I have wondered if the eastern NA G. castaneus may actually represent more than one species. Color and size of fruit bodies seem to vary considerably.

This collection obs 140672 from an area with little oak (probably none within 100 feet of the mushrooms) shows staining on the pores.

introduced tree …
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2016-05-20 18:23:15 PDT (-0700)

who knows what it had on its roots?

certain not naturalized or a native sp.

Hahaha
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2012-10-25 09:49:48 PDT (-0700)

You’ll have your KOH, Sam.

However, it should be noted that the stipe has to be mature for the pith to hollow out completely “hollow or partially hollow at maturity”. I wonder if you sectioned all of them, Nick?

Second, I don’t see any bruising on the pores that isn’t normal discoloration for the western Gyroporus.

KOH
By: Sam.Schaperow (SamSchaperow)
2012-10-25 09:16:49 PDT (-0700)

I could use a bottle of it. :)

More on the stipe…
By: nicksherman
2012-10-25 08:54:15 PDT (-0700)

Hi everybody. The stipe is in fact NOT HOLLOW, so Christian owes somebody a bottle of KOH. The stipe is solid and actually fairly chalky in the way it snaps easily.

As far as neighboring trees or root systems, there are no nearby visible, but others have commented that sometimes the presence of pinus will have the same effect and there are some pine-looking trees in the neighbors yard. It’s also possible, as I live in an old neighborhood, that there could have been an old oak that is no longer around…but that’s just mere speculation.

I’m sending off some samples to be sequenced so we can get to the bottom of this but I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the conversation thus far!

Thanks to all.
-Nick

Christian,
By: Sam.Schaperow (SamSchaperow)
2012-10-25 07:00:38 PDT (-0700)

Yes, the broken stipe may not be enough data to determine how its interior is. I hope Nick can weigh in on that, too.

Now, if Gyroporus, how do we explain the bruising on the pore surface (maybe another species of Gyroporus bruises?)?

On a mushrooom group called MushroomTalk*, I had listed lots of Gyroporus species, but I don’t think anyone there either had a confident proposal of another species than this.

*There many experts have commented, including Bill Yule, David Arora, David Spahr, Bill Neil, Dimitar B. (cort expert). David Arora offered to get these species sequenced, too. You might want to check out the group’s discussion. http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/... is to this particular thread.

Stipe
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2012-10-24 22:15:17 PDT (-0700)

is not cross-sectioned in any of the photos, but I’d bet a bottle of KOH that the stipe is hollow in these specimens. Maybe Nick can weigh in.

Christian:
By: Sam.Schaperow (SamSchaperow)
2012-10-24 14:56:41 PDT (-0700)

Does G. castaneus have a solid stipe? This one appears solid, anyway.

By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2012-10-24 14:02:26 PDT (-0700)

(in this case S. molle) are extremely common in southern California, many recruit from trees nearby. Doubtful at this point that the tree was obtained from S. America.

Not Piper
By: Sam.Schaperow (SamSchaperow)
2012-10-24 13:56:58 PDT (-0700)

The tree isn’t piper, but Schinus. Note the pinnately compound leaves with # of leaflets, plus the drupes are pink. This tree, if sold from another country, was likely obtained from South America, hence it is possible you have a South American Boletales.

Please allow a recommendation: If you eat it, be very careful to have a very small amount, wait 24 hours, then a larger amount, wait 24 hours, and then finally have the rest (this method may not work in all cases, but should sift out the vast majority of dangers). The reason for any caution in such a benign looking mushroom is that while all Boletales that look like this are not known to be poisonous, there is a remote chance that somewhere in South America there are dangerous Boletales, if even rare. Analogously, while it appears all well-cooked corals in North America & other places are relatively safe, there does exist an Asian coral or coral-looking mushroom that is very deadly.

Wow.
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2012-10-24 13:55:16 PDT (-0700)

These are definitely Gyroporus, and the western ‘G. castaneus’ can get pretty pale-capped. But the lack of an oak nearby would be surprising. Can you confirm that there aren’t any within root-reach, Nick?

It’s also notable how far south in the state these are.

Neat observation! If you could dehydrate some of these, Naveed Davoodian at the NYBG might be interested in them; he is working on this genus right now. If he doesn’t want them, I certainly would be happy to take a look at them.

not likely it
By: Sam.Schaperow (SamSchaperow)
2012-10-22 17:20:20 PDT (-0700)

Nick:

I am doubtful (previously “not likely)” of it being Gyroporus castaneus because:

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/gyroporus_castaneus.html states they don’t bruise, yet the pores look bruised (but can you confirm if they did bruise/discolor, or if that might be some other reason why the look as they look?). 1. They are rare there. 2. The cuticle is extra-light colored. 3. The pilei have cracks throughout, rather than concentrated at the cuticles. Hum, these really don’t exhibit the kinds of cracks I’m used to.

However, imported trees, said the link above, are where they’re found in your area.

Things to consider:

-Are they mycorrhizal with pepper trees? (BTW, which of these trees are you calling pepper? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pepper_tree). -Was the tree imported? If so, could you have something from your area that liked the tree, or could you have something not even found in the United States? -That’s some nice wood sorrel you have there (yum!).

Sam Schaperow, B.S., M.S.
Foraging.Posterous.com
P.S. I’ve taken to just saying “Boletales” to cover the various genera of “boletes”.

Created: 2012-10-22 15:04:12 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2016-05-20 18:23:41 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 238 times, last viewed: 2016-11-11 15:11:07 PST (-0800)
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