Observation 11576: Hydnellum scrobiculatum (Fr.) P. Karst.
When: 2008-09-18
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Found under pine, some oaks were near enough. I’m never sure what to do with Hydnellum… Tom Volk has promised some hope in the future? I also wonder sometimes what are the significant characters that I should look for here.

Proposed Names

29% (1)
Eye3
Recognized by sight
53% (1)
Eyes3
Recognized by sight: From my student Sean Westmoreland’s thesis: Hydnellum concrescens can be separated from H. scrobiculatum in that the former has tubercles that appear worn down, whereas the later has the prominent spore tubercles. Also, in our study, we noted a difference in spore size between the two species. The spores of H. scrobiculatum were on average (n=60) 5.26 X 4.83 µm, whereas the spores on average (n=60) for H. concrescens were 4.3 X 3.68 µm. Also, H. scrobiculatum has a larger fruiting body, up to 9 cm wide, whereas H. concrescens has a pileus width of 2.5—4.4 cm wide individually, up to 7 cm wide when fused. The presence of pileal zone lines to distinguish these two species is of little value since there is a range in number of zone lines in each collection of each species.
There has been quite some confusion in the literature (Maas Geesteranus 1957) about which fungi belong to H. concrescens or H. scrobiculatum. There are two varieties that I have examined (Fig. 9), one that is small, thin fleshed, and has spores with processes that appear as if they are almost eroded away. It grows more scattered but may exist in concrescent patches. The other form is larger, more concrescent, and with thicker flesh and has spores with prominent tubercles. Because of this uncertainty in which specimen to assign what name, the naming of these species may be reversed.
Hydnellum concrescens can be separated from H. scrobiculatum in that the former has tubercles that appear worn down, whereas the later has the prominent spore tubercles. Also, in our study, we noted a difference in spore size between the two species. The spores of H. scrobiculatum were on average (n=60) 5.26 X 4.83 µm, whereas the spores on average (n=60) for H. concrescens were 4.3 X 3.68 µm. Also, H. scrobiculatum has a larger fruiting body, up to 9 cm wide, whereas H. concrescens has a pileus width of 2.5—4.4 cm wide individually, up to 7 cm wide when fused. The presence of pileal zone lines to distinguish these two species is of little value since there is a range in number of zone lines in each collection of each species.
There has been quite some confusion in the literature (Maas Geesteranus 1957) about which fungi belong to H. concrescens or H. scrobiculatum. There are two varieties that I have examined (Fig. 9), one that is small, thin fleshed, and has spores with processes that appear as if they are almost eroded away. It grows more scattered but may exist in concrescent patches. The other form is larger, more concrescent, and with thicker flesh and has spores with prominent tubercles. Because of this uncertainty in which specimen to assign what name, the naming of these species may be reversed.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

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Created: 2008-09-25 15:22:04 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2008-09-25 15:22:25 CDT (-0400)
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