Observation 115902: Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.) P. Kumm.
When: 2012-11-05
No herbarium specimen

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Willow is a preferred species.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2012-11-07 14:01:46 CST (-0600)

Oak, Red alder, The Oregonian newspaper, a roll of paper towels, an old copy of Mushroom Cultivator: all seem to grow P.o. well.

I think growing oysters on alder produces mushrooms faster, maybe. First fruiting in 2 years? That’s excessive. I usually have mushroom growing within 6 months from inoculation, as late as a year after inoculation.

Oyster mushrooms are not at all picky about what they grow on. They grow well on wheat or oat straw bales (as well as many other mushrooms). Paper. Loosely packed straw or hay: almost anything with cellulose in it. Anything with cellulose or hemicellulose is the key to growing them, I think.

When I grow them on wood, I like to inoculate the wood within a month of cutting. That seems to be enough time for the wood to dry out a little bit, but not enough time for other fungi to get a good foothold on the logs.

By: maynardjameskeenan
2012-11-06 22:59:19 CST (-0600)

They are cultivated from spawn plugs, this is the first time they have ever fruited in almost 2 years. The wood is willow which I thought was a hardwood so I used it, in your opinion is that going to be okay? Or should I have used a different kind of wood?

A curious observation, Marynard.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2012-11-06 17:49:36 CST (-0600)

Usually Pleurotus ostreatus grows on hardwoods, like oak, alder and poplars. Do you know what this is growing on? Was it cultivated? It looks remarkably like Douglas-fir, which is not known to host P. ostreatus. At least before your obs.

Created: 2012-11-05 21:29:01 CST (-0600)
Last modified: 2012-11-05 21:29:02 CST (-0600)
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