Observation 116436: Boletus L.
When: 2012-11-11
No herbarium specimen

Proposed Names

62% (2)
Recognized by sight
22% (4)
Recognized by sight: vinaceous flesh in the lower part of the stem

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus


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I don’t know about Germany,
By: Gerhard Koller (Gerhard)
2012-11-15 15:03:25 EST (-0500)

but here in Austria this variety was rather common this year (look at my posts). It can be totally yellow to the color of your find. It is very variable but once you have developed an eye for it you can distinguish it from the type variety pretty well. It grows in rather thermophilous deciduous forests but also in mixed ones. With oaks, beeches and the like. Not conifers.
Boletus queletii can be found in rather similar habitats but more to the south in hornbeam-oak forests that are very protected from cold and is growing during very wet seasons in high summer to early fall. Also take a look at my observations if you like. I am still not finished uploading the many Bolete photos of this year but many are on the site by now.

By: deuteragenie
2012-11-15 13:52:57 EST (-0500)

Flesh was turning rapidly and intensely blue. This would support B. erythropus indeed.

I do not think this is B. queletii.
By: Gerhard Koller (Gerhard)
2012-11-15 05:14:04 EST (-0500)

First, it is too late in the season for that.
Secondly, the cap color is off the pattern. It is much too dark in the middle. Also the color of the pores does not fit. Way too dark.

I would propose this to be called BOLETUS ERYTHROPUS SSP. DISCOLOR.

nice Irene!
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2012-11-13 10:19:39 EST (-0500)

a bolete with a distinctive character. ;)

I noticed that purple context in the base as well, but couldn’t link it with a taxa.

Here’s a page on queletii from the Boletales Website of European boletes, discussing how to separate it from the similar luridiformis:


Boletus pulverulentus
By: walt sturgeon (Mycowalt)
2012-11-12 19:40:31 EST (-0500)

does not have red pores.

what is pulverulent about this mushroom?
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2012-11-12 19:25:55 EST (-0500)

it looks like a dead ringer for our NA B. amygdalinus, altho I know nothing about your European boletes and don’t know what this is.

Created: 2012-11-11 16:45:04 EST (-0500)
Last modified: 2012-11-15 07:28:00 EST (-0500)
Viewed: 104 times, last viewed: 2016-10-22 16:19:15 EDT (-0400)
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