Observation 117319: Boletus fibrillosus Thiers
When: 2012-11-19
Who: funferal
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Habitat:
Pacific Northwest, Salish Sea coast. Growing in moss under western red cedar, no other trees around.

Gills:
Pores/tubes white.

Stem:
Stems thick, bulbous/club-shaped, solid white all the way through, with fine brown web reticulations.

Cap:
Chocolate brown, convex, hard, slightly incurved margin, wrinkly towards the edges.

Spore print color:
Olive brown.

Bruising:
None.

Other information:
Mild mushroomy smell, raw mushroom taste & texture similar to cultivated agaricus mushrooms.

Proposed Names

-30% (3)
Used references: checked key on MushroomExpert.com
89% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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regineus?
By: funferal
2012-11-19 23:04:18 PST (-0800)

ID discussion on The Shroomery:
http://www.shroomery.org/...

Okay, so two MO folks are going with fibrillosus; is b. regineus ruled out as a candidate? MushroomExpert infers it grows exclusively under hardwoods, but MykoWeb says “It is distinguished from the King Bolete by habitat preference—mixed hardwood/conifer woods in contrast to mostly pines for Boletus edulis, a whitish bloom in youth, and a more equal stipe at maturity.”

regineus is positively found in British Columbia, whereas I’ve found only one report of b. fibrillosus here.

What distinguishes b. fibrillosus from b. regineus in this case?

regineus?
By: funferal
2012-11-19 23:04:08 PST (-0800)

ID discussion on The Shroomery:
http://www.shroomery.org/...

Okay, so two MO folks are going with fibrillosus; is b. regineus ruled out as a candidate? MushroomExpert infers it grows exclusively under hardwoods, but MykoWeb says “It is distinguished from the King Bolete by habitat preference—mixed hardwood/conifer woods in contrast to mostly pines for Boletus edulis, a whitish bloom in youth, and a more equal stipe at maturity.”

regineus is positively found in British Columbia, whereas I’ve found only one report of b. fibrillosus here.

What distinguishes b. fibrillosus from b. regineus in this case?

edibility
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2012-11-19 22:27:54 PST (-0800)

It’s fairly good textured, not as flavorful as B. edulis var. grandedulis.
It passed through my digestion unscathed, not to put too fine an edge on it.

yummy?
By: funferal
2012-11-19 22:16:49 PST (-0800)

Thank you for your input! They passed the raw taste test with flying colours, so in any case, I’m looking forward to them as a good edible. Have you harvested them for the table before? Can I look forward to a delicious treat?

-
By: Noah Siegel (Noah)
2012-11-19 21:57:45 PST (-0800)

The dark cap when young (which yours are), white stuffed pores when young that become yellow to yellow-olive in age, and the reticulated, slightly rotted brown stipe all point to Boletus fibrillosus. I have found lots of it in WA, where it is common under mixed conifers, especially fir.

fibrillosus?
By: funferal
2012-11-19 21:02:02 PST (-0800)

A user changed the name to b. fibrillosus on sight, presumably based on cap colour. I’m doubtful, as MushroomExpert says that the pores are yellow, & the stipe typically yellows toward the cap. The specimens I collected have white pores & no yellowing whatsoever on the stipes. I’ve only found one reference on the web to fibrillosus being in British Columbia [albeit pretty close to here.] Another possibility is b. regineus. I’m new here, I don’t know the protocols, but if someone else changes the name, how do I know their knowledge of mycology is superior to mine?

Anyway, if the user who suggested b. fibrillosus could chime in one why he chose fibrillosus, I would appreciate it.

or boletus regineus?
By: funferal
2012-11-19 19:01:58 PST (-0800)

Dark cap colour suggests it might be b. regineus.

Created: 2012-11-19 18:35:57 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2012-11-20 09:38:12 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 154 times, last viewed: 2016-11-27 19:04:29 PST (-0800)
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