Observation 117823: Pisolithus arrhizus (Scop.) Rauschert
When: 2012-11-24
No herbarium specimen

Species Lists


From the outside, a powdery, gooey (when wet) spore mass.
From the inside, a powdery, gooey (when wet) spore mass, but with interesting peridioles.
Greenish peridioles continue to degrade, releasing more spores.

Proposed Names

86% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: Dead Man’s Foot, Dye-Maker’s Puffball. Distinctive peridioles within gleba.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus


Add Comment
Inedible at best, poisonous at worst.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2012-11-24 19:22:12 COT (-0500)

Arora calls it "Not recommended. In Europe it is known as the “Bohemian Truffle” and used as an aromatic seasoning when unripe, and in China it is employed medicinally."

At one time P. arrhizus was rarely considered, because of the omnipresent Pisolithus tinctorius. When it was determined they were synonymous, P. arrhizus got the nod as the earlier-named species.

By: Sam.Schaperow (SamSchaperow)
2012-11-24 18:38:21 COT (-0500)

http://www.rogersmushrooms.com/... lists it as “Very rare.”

Yet, there are a good # of MOs.

I also see it listed there as “inedible”. Seems the bset use would be bioremediation, however if you can tell me more detail about its taste, texture, and odor, I might actually come up w/something good to use it in. :)


Easy to cultivate.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2012-11-24 18:27:18 COT (-0500)

This widely mycorrhizal species happened to be found with beech. But I’ve also found it with Pinus, Douglas-fir, Quercus, Rhododendron, spruce, and many other trees and shrubs. It is among the most widely mycorrhizal fungus around. This will likely be used in bioremediation efforts along the Lower Willamette River, a designated Superfund clean-up area.

Created: 2012-11-24 18:23:52 COT (-0500)
Last modified: 2012-11-24 18:23:57 COT (-0500)
Viewed: 40 times, last viewed: 2016-10-22 17:22:51 COT (-0500)
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