Observation 118730: Tuber melanosporum Vittad.
When: 2012-12-03
No herbarium specimen

Notes: I am quite sure that it is in genus tuber, but cannot be absolute about being a melanosporum species.

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Don’t think T. melanosporum, Andrew.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2012-12-04 07:20:26 CST (-0500)

The peridium of T. melanosporum has large pyramidal black warts. These warts should be visible to the naked eye. The surface of the peridium here appears whitish, and lacks warts. Also, the peridium seems rather thick for T. melanosporum. You are correct to state melanosporum has black spores: in fact that’s what melanosporum means.

An additional test for T. melanosporum is the aroma. Fresh it should be similar to concentrated oil of garlic. My sole exposure to T. melanosporum was from Franklin Garland’s fresh material that made my eyes water while 20 feet upwind in a 30 mph wind. If your eyes were watering (crying might be a better word) while near it, this might be T. melanosporum. Otherwise, it might be one of the other black-spored Tubers. There are several. I don’t think all have been described in science yet.

Do you know where
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2012-12-03 16:59:24 CST (-0500)

the specimen was found? Where it originated from?

Tuber melanosporum from the US is known only from occasional collections in NC and TN, and specifically from T. melanosporum trufflieres. Another suspected truffliere was established in northern CA (Ukiah, perhaps?) over 15 years ago, but I have not seen material from that site.

T. melanosporum should have pyramidal warts on the peridium.

Created: 2012-12-03 03:44:26 CST (-0500)
Last modified: 2012-12-03 03:44:31 CST (-0500)
Viewed: 51 times, last viewed: 2016-10-27 01:39:23 CDT (-0400)
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