Observation 131278: Lactarius subpurpureus Peck
When: 2012-09-21
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Tannish caps with depressed disc, spots on cap, darker brown towards the disc, green in the depression. Gills adnate ,close and reddish-brown on some of the margins. Stipe enlarged slightly towards the base. Don’t remember the color of the latex. Disc, gills and stipe with green stains. Cap margin incurved. Found in Larch, Pine woods. Stipe hollow, but may be due to age and/or insects. This mushroom was a bit old when I found it.

Proposed Names

40% (2)
Used references: Milk Mushrooms Of North America
61% (2)
Eyes3
Recognized by sight

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Yes it would
By: Phil (gunchky)
2016-09-26 13:43:30 CDT (-0400)

as would many other that I haven’t found yet.

I have seen old examples of subpurpureus…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2016-09-25 23:41:24 CDT (-0400)

that showed green staining, like the really old one seen here obs 110259. I’m not saying subpurpureus is wrong, just that there’s a few other possibilities.

Chelidonium would be a nice find around here; at least in my experience.

It has been
By: Phil (gunchky)
2016-09-25 23:12:37 CDT (-0400)

four years since this was found, and as I said this is the condition it was in as found. Read BHB, p. 247; flesh, red when cut, especially next to the gills (observe photo) then becoming greenish. Whatever disturbed this might have noticed red staining but I’ll never know. Don’t speak any animal languages :(

Well, this one’s kinda old and dried up.
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2016-09-25 22:54:21 CDT (-0400)

I think there are possibilities other than subpurpureus. The green stain on the cut context seems unusual for subpurpureus. Did you observe any wine-red latex? It’s usually pretty scant; pressing a finger on the cut context is the best way to see it (on your finger).

From MushroomExpert description of subpurpureus, " Mycorrhizal with eastern hemlock and perhaps with other conifers." I don’t recall ever finding this species where there was no hemlock.

Au contraire
By: Phil (gunchky)
2016-09-25 22:38:26 CDT (-0400)

L. subpurpureus occurs in conifer or mixed woods, usually with Pine or Hemlock. The presence of Larch is inconsequential, but affords me the opportunity to gather some Suillus species. The stipe has what appears to be red scrobiculations. All told the description In BRB matches this specimen very well. This mushroom was in this condition when found. In any event you’ve given me something to think about and look for.

I have never found L. chelidonium.
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2016-09-25 19:42:45 CDT (-0400)

But in the past I have seen this species at the NJ Fungus Festival.

Pine/larch would be an unusual habitat for L. subpurpureus. I find this species occasionally, always in hemlock-dominated woods.

Perhaps L. paradoxus may also be considered?
http://www.mushroomexpert.com/lactarius_paradoxus.html

Walt
By: Phil (gunchky)
2013-04-04 20:27:42 CDT (-0400)

Thank-You. I’ll be in the area were I found this again this year. Hopefully I will find a fresher specimen that I can define more specifically.

Created: 2013-04-04 11:13:09 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2016-09-25 19:40:35 CDT (-0400)
Viewed: 94 times, last viewed: 2016-11-09 16:45:22 CST (-0500)
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