Observation 137305: Laccaria pumila Fayod
When: 2013-06-21
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Multiple fruiting along creek.

Proposed Names

58% (1)
Recognized by sight
Based on microscopic features: Spore size is in the lower range for L. altaica (add ~17% to dimensions as seen in photo).
92% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight
Used references: MO

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Thanks Davide.
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2016-02-03 19:13:56 MST (-0700)

I’ll certainly remember to consult this key when I make Laccaria collections this coming summer. And, I’ll put a little more effort into checking micro.

wait
By: Davide Puddu (Davide Puddu)
2016-02-03 12:43:10 MST (-0700)

this is really based on solely spore dimensions?
Start by checking the basidia, if they are bisporic(they should be) or tetrasporic.
This is a key for Italian Laccaria ,maybe it could be useful :
Key to the species of Laccaria in Italy
1. Gill edge and often also stipe surface with numerous and evident cylindrical, subfusiform, clavate or
lanceolate cystidia, 8–12 μm wide ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 2
× Gill edge without this kind of cystidia; marginal cells, when present, cylindrical or flexuous, rarely wider than
6 μm …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3
2. Basidiocarps, when fresh, entirely amethyst or violet coloured; in coniferous and deciduous forests, more
common in Northern and Central Italy.
Laccaria amethystina
× Basidiocarps, when fresh, fawn reddish to pale salmon pink; in deciduous and coniferous forests, in scrubs,
often densely caespitose, more common in Central and Southern Italy.
Laccaria macrocystidiata
3. Basidia mostly 1- or 2- spored, rarely 3-spored ………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
× Basidia mostly 4-spored, rarely 2-spored ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 8
4. Basidiocarps with reddish colours, with evident lilac hues; smell distinct, more or less fruity; in the
mountains.
Laccaria vinaceorosea
× Basidiocarps without lilac hues; smell different …………………………………………………………………………………. 5
5. Spores of medium size, not longer than 12 μm ………………………………………………………………………………….. 6
× Spores big, mostly exceeding 12 μm in length …………………………………………………………………………………… 7
6. Spores with 1.3–1.8–2 μm long, scattered, pyramidal spines, squamulose-areolate cap, striate only near the
margin; fibrillose striate stipe; coniferous and deciduous forests, in the mountains especially.
Laccaria bisporigera
× Spores with 0.8–1 μm long, conical, rather dense spines; cap almost smooth, entirely striate, stipe slightly
fibrillose; with Acacia, Eucalyptus and Cupressus, particularly in the Mediterranean area.
Laccaria lateritia
7. Ellipsoid spores, with 0.5–0.8 μm long spines, occurring especially at high altitudes.
Laccaria pumila
× Globose spores, with 1.5–3 μm long spines; in damp places, next to streams, not at high altitudes.
Laccaria tortilis
8. Basidiocarps, when fresh, with violet basal mycelium ………………………………………………………………………… 9
× Basal mycelium white, at most slightly wine-coloured ………………………………………………………………………. 12
9. Cap and stipe with reddish or fawn colours ……………………………………………………………………………………… 10
× Cap and stipe with different colours ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
10. Gills whitish pink or pale pink, spores almost globose; in coniferous forests or scrubs.
Laccaria trichodermophora
× Gills violet or amethystine lilac, spores subglobose to broadly ellipsoid; in coniferous and deciduous forests,
in the mountains especially.
Laccaria bicolor
11. Cap pale alutaceous brown, not squamulose, entirely translucently striate; in coniferous forests.
Laccaria decipiens
× Cap deep amethystine violet, ornate by small blackish scales, not translucently striate; with Pseudotsuga.
Laccaria violaceonigra
12. Spores globose to subglobose ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13
× Spore broadly ellipsoid to subcylindrical ………………………………………………………………………………………… 14
13. Spores with 1–2.5 μm long, pyramidal, scattered spines; basidiocarpi growing in dense clusters, in damp
places.
Laccaria tetraspora
× Spores with conical, dense, rarely longer than 2.5 μm spines; basidiocarps gregarious but usually not
caespitose.
Laccaria affinis
14. Spores rarely longer than 10 μm, broadly ellipsoid …………………………………………………………………………… 15
× Spores normally longer than 10 μm, elongate or subcylindric …………………………………………………………….. 17
15. Basidiocarps purple brown or chestnut purple, rather dark; hyphae of the cap cuticle with encrusting pigment;
with Betula.
Laccaria purpureobadia
× Basidiocarps fawn to orange reddish, hyphae of the cap cuticle without encrusting pigment ………………….. 16
16. At high altitudes; small species, cap often overall translucently striate; spores big, longer than 10 μm.
Laccaria montana
× Ubiquitous; basidiocarps medium sized or slender, cap rarely translucently striate; spores small, rarely longer
than 10 μm.
Laccaria laccata
17. Stipe smooth, not fibrillose; very small, often caespitose basidiocarps, with flesh pink gills, on stony or
degraded soil, in the mountains.
Laccaria proximella
× Stipe strongly fibrillose striate, basidiocarps robust and slender, never caespitose, with fawn reddish, more or
less light gills; in deciduous and coniferous forests, often also in scrubs.
Laccaria proxima

Actually, seeing 155876…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2016-02-03 11:59:22 MST (-0700)

got me started on looking at some of my old Laccaria posts this morning. 155876 certainly looks like what I had been calling altaica, which now appears to be called pumila.

There seems to be a fair amount of confusion surrounding the Laccaria species names altaica, pumila, and striatula. I put a few comments out to see if anyone may shed a little additional light upon how to apply these names.

Dave
By: Phil (gunchky)
2016-02-03 10:29:06 MST (-0700)

Look at MO obs 155876.

Created: 2013-06-22 10:59:23 MDT (-0600)
Last modified: 2016-02-03 10:28:20 MST (-0700)
Viewed: 63 times, last viewed: 2016-11-28 03:51:09 MST (-0700)
Show Log