Observation 141061: Russula foetentula Peck
When: 2013-07-25

Notes: Almond scented Russula sp. in mixed woods. No clear association was noted, but mature Oaks are present. This species is present in this location year after year and this collection represents examples in relatively good condition. This Russula is always attacked by slugs very rapidly and anything more mature than early buttons is typically in poor shape. Taste is mildly hot. Spores scraped together en masse are cream to yellow (D-E) on the Kibby-Fatto scale and the broadly ellipsoid spores have pronounced amyloid spines (up to 1.7 micron long) with little to no connectivity between spines. The 20 spore average is 7.9 × 6.6 with Qm = 1.21. The abundant elongated pleurocystidia have a nipple-like end and stain strongly green-brown in Melzers.

Species Lists

Images

352400
This Russula is always attacked by slugs very rapidly and anything more mature than early buttons is typically in poor shape.
352399
The abundant elongated pleurocystidia have a nipple-like end and stain strongly green-brown in Melzers.
352401
352402
352403
Spores have pronounced amyloid spines (up to 1.7 micron long)
353140

Proposed Names

28% (1)
Recognized by sight: areolate cap? Russulalaes News claims that this feature alone can get your ID.
Based on microscopic features: according to Rogers Mushrooms, spores can be white as well as cream or yellow-orange.
46% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Used references: Kibby and Fatto key

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Hi Brian, you are absolutely correct ….
By: Linas Kudzma (baravykas)
2013-07-29 16:25:21 CDT (-0500)

I remember that Ray evaluated spore color en masse. I should have known better! I still have the spores on a glass slide and I did this. The result is photographed with the scrapped together spores on a slide on top of a the original color chart in my circa 1990 copy of Ray’s booklet. Now the spores appear much darker and I’d say it’s D-E. Picture attached is under 5400K lights.

Spore print
By: Brian Looney (GibbiPicasso)
2013-07-29 13:40:59 CDT (-0500)

Hi Linas. I was wondering how you got your spore print color. The colors given in Kibby and Fatto are intended to be read en masse. I take spore prints on glass slides and use a razor blade to scrape them into a pile and use another slide to squash the print into a dense patty. The print tends to be darker en masse, which might lead you to R. foetentula in the Kibby Fatto key. With no connectives in the spores, a strong almond, and no granules on the cap I would say it is probably not R. granulata. Also, I only find R. granulata here at the high elevation Spruce-Fir zone of the Smoky mountains where there are no Quercus spp. If the SP color is still too light, then I don’t think it is in the Kibby Fatto key.

Russula granulata …
By: Linas Kudzma (baravykas)
2013-07-27 16:49:22 CDT (-0500)

but the spore print is white/pale cream and not yellow/orange as that R. granulata should have. Everything else matched well.

My thought was …
By: Linas Kudzma (baravykas)
2013-07-27 16:46:59 CDT (-0500)
I agree that …
By: Linas Kudzma (baravykas)
2013-07-27 15:02:28 CDT (-0500)

… with these distinct features I should ID this. I’ll work on it with some of the Russula people I know, including one on that list you sent (thanks!) from russulales-news.

Yes, these long cystidia do look like lactifers. Other Russula with the almond smell also have those “nipple” tips. See my Obs 104626. I’ll be checking others in my herbarium for this feature.

great micrograph!
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2013-07-27 13:38:23 CDT (-0500)

you would think with all of those distinctive features that you could find a name for this interesting Russula.

Love those nippled pleurocystidia; they remind me of lactifers.

Maybe Bart Buyck would know what this russula is? Here’s a whole page of Russula experts, from Europe to the USA:

http://www.mtsn.tn.it/bresadola/russula/people.asp

Created: 2013-07-26 13:49:03 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2013-08-06 18:50:00 CDT (-0500)
Viewed: 231 times, last viewed: 2016-11-06 09:37:32 CST (-0600)
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