Observation 147622: Amanita wellsii (Murrill) Murrill

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I hope somebody finds one with…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-07-26 12:02:31 CDT (-0500)

1. more of the fluffy, wispy volva still on the cap and

2. writes down the nearby trees.

Very best,

Rod

Some hunting areas in Mingo are near cypress marshes
By: Patrick Harvey (pg_harvey)
2015-07-26 11:32:30 CDT (-0500)

I don’t recall what what trees were near this one.

At Mingo, do you find this in a particularly wet place?
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-07-25 20:46:39 CDT (-0500)

Maybe with alders?

Very best,

Rod

There was recently another posting of the species from Missouri on MO. EDITED.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-07-25 20:40:08 CDT (-0500)

We need to try to get material that has been dried very well before the specimen has gotten too old…so that we have a good chance of getting DNA. While it’s very useful to have the “proposed fungal barcode” sequence, it’s also very important to get sequences of genes that are less liable to mutation.

We just sent a large shipment of samples from species of section Amanita to Dr. Geml. Hopefully, we will get new sequences that will help us understand something…or maybe not. :) :( <—Note: Greek masks of comedy and tragedy.

Very best,

Rod

Mingo
By: Patrick Harvey (pg_harvey)
2015-07-25 16:24:06 CDT (-0500)

We find this at Mingo, I’ll be sure to have everyone keep an eye out for it this year. Britt likes them too.

— Patrick

Feedback on sequencing.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-07-25 12:21:57 CDT (-0500)

This species does not have the same nrITS (“proposed fungal barcode”) sequence as collections ranging from fairly far north in Quebec to Massachusetts. We have too few samples to understand what the differences imply. So we are very interested in seeing more recently collected, well-dried, well-documented material that is wellsii-like and from south of Massachusetts.

Very best,

Rod

You’re very welcome!
By: Patrick Harvey (pg_harvey)
2014-03-16 19:53:52 CDT (-0500)

Right now, we’re just waiting for winter to let go in the Midwest. Hope to find more interesting things for you next year.

I am not sure of the host trees, I did not find them on our foray at Mingo, but rescued them Sunday from he specimen tables.

— Patrick

The one spot where I have found this type…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2014-03-16 18:39:47 CDT (-0500)

here in NE PA is mainly populated with small gray birch trees (Betula populifolia), some small spruce trees, cranberry plants, and other wild shrubs. The area is over 2000’ asl, an upland acidic environment. The Amanitas were found in a dry patch along a wide trail that runs through a swampy area. There are blueberry bushes in the vicinity, but not very close to where I have seen the A. wellsii. While xx-skiing the trail a couple weeks ago, I noticed some blueberry bushes maybe a few hundred yards from the spot. Another type of mushroom that’s common along the same trail is a light gray/tan Leccinum that I believe is either L. holopus or L. oxydabile.

I should note that this material was sampled for DNA sequencing in Sept. 2013.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-03-16 18:26:16 CDT (-0500)

Since I didn’t see a thank you here, I checked the history of the material in my herbarium. First thing is to say thanks to Patrick for the material, which has been sent to Dr. Geml in Leiden for sequencing. I haven’t heard any feedback from him lately. He is very busy.

R

In Michigan
By: walt sturgeon (Mycowalt)
2014-03-16 16:40:52 CDT (-0500)
I have seen it under alder with willow in the vicinity.
In Quebec,…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-03-16 16:30:33 CDT (-0500)

we saw this species with alder, aspen, birch, and pine in a blueberry understory. In Maine, Sam Ristich reported it growing in a field of blueberries far from any trees. It would be very fascinating if it could grow with species that form endocmycorrhizae as Sam’s observation could suggest. David Malloch has reported it beyond the treeline in the subarctic with alder. Thise species has a tremendous range.

Rod

Patrick
By: walt sturgeon (Mycowalt)
2014-03-16 16:01:59 CDT (-0500)

Host tree possibilities?

Thanks Patrick,
By: groundhog
2013-11-26 14:10:49 CST (-0600)

This material has been recieved and accessioned into Rod’s herbarium. We have also scheduled it for DNA sequencing.
-Naomi

Thank you, Patrick.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2013-10-09 21:06:38 CDT (-0500)

You may have heard my pitch about being able to tell the history of a specimen from the distribution of spore lengths in the dried fruiting body. Now I’m learning some of the things that can alter a specimen’s value for DNA work.

Very best,

Rod

It’s on the way …
By: Patrick Harvey (pg_harvey)
2013-10-09 20:49:24 CDT (-0500)

Just sent that out this afternoon. Also turned down my dehydrator — it was much too high!

— Patrick

I’d love to see the dried material, Patrick.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2013-10-09 18:13:52 CDT (-0500)

Rod

Created: 2013-10-07 22:33:25 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2014-03-16 13:36:02 CDT (-0500)
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