Observation 148900: Coprinus Pers.
When: 2013-10-16
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Growing at base of Black cottonwood, and in a degraded area of a Black cottonwood trunk.

Images

376654
In situ, near root of old-growth Black cottonwood.
376655
Another clump near photo 1a.
376656
Stipe is white, cap is 3-inches, with yellowish cap and cap edges.
376657
Black gills.
376658
Annulus present in photo Coprinus1f. Caps can be twice this size, but caps are still proportionate.
376659
Annulus present in photo Coprinus1f. Caps can be twice this size, but caps are still proportionate.
376660
Annulus present in photo Coprinus1f. Caps can be twice this size, but caps are still proportionate.
376661
Annulus present in photo Coprinus1f. Caps can be twice this size, but caps are still proportionate.
376662
Large caps (slightly scaley?) emerging from base of old-growth Black cottonwood. Tree was 6-feet diameter at least.
376668
In damaged Black cottonwood hole. Caps show some scales, but only where protected.
376669
Scales on cap easily sluff off. This specimen was growing 8 feet from the ground.
376670
More volval patches on cap.
376671
Gills starting to blacken as cap separates from stipe.
376672
Close-up of cap edge.
376673
More photos of what I believe is the same Coprinus, growing from old-growth Black cottonwood near the base. Cap cluster is over 14 inches across. I’d estimate each cap was arrising from 3 inches deeper, making the entire cap nearly 8 inches tall at this stage.
376674
More photos of what I believe is the same Coprinus, growing from old-growth Black cottonwood near the base. Cap cluster is over 14 inches across. I’d estimate each cap was arrising from 3 inches deeper, making the entire cap nearly 8 inches tall at this stage.
376675
More photos of what I believe is the same Coprinus, growing from old-growth Black cottonwood near the base. Cap cluster is over 14 inches across. I’d estimate each cap was arrising from 3 inches deeper, making the entire cap nearly 8 inches tall at this stage.
376676
More photos of what I believe is the same Coprinus, growing from old-growth Black cottonwood near the base. Cap cluster is over 14 inches across. I’d estimate each cap was arrising from 3 inches deeper, making the entire cap nearly 8 inches tall at this stage.

Proposed Names

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Used references: Arora, Mushrooms Demystified.

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Comments

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You may be right.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2013-10-19 06:11:31 CDT (-0400)

The photos of fungi growing from the base of Black cottonwood, still have some small scales on the cap visible. It is my theory that they are the same species, but the scales have been rubbed off by pushing through the sandy soil. By growing inside the Black cottonwood, some images have more scales, as they are completely protected from the elements of wind, rain, and sand.

It may be difficult to tell from these photos taken in bright sunlight, but sand erosion can be a factor. Less than a week ago this area had winds of 60+mph, and the Columbia River is visible in the background.

That said, I’ve not seen C. atramentarius of this stature before: 8 inches or more tall at this stage of maturity, and in caespitose clusters that are simply massive.

Mixed collection.
By: Byrain
2013-10-18 12:34:16 CDT (-0400)

The first group of images are probably mostly Coprinopsis atramentaria, some of them are too small/blurry to tell conclusively though. Starting at img 376668, img 376669, img 376670 you have a different species, you can tell because of the patchy veil your C. atramentaria lacks, I’m not sure if its Coprinopsis or Coprinellus. Starting at img 376675 & img 376676 you may have yet another species, but your pics are not good enough to identify…

Created: 2013-10-16 19:50:24 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2013-10-20 05:35:28 CDT (-0400)
Viewed: 35 times, last viewed: 2016-09-24 03:44:24 CDT (-0400)
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