Observation 153454: Amanita Pers.
When: 2013-11-21
Who: DCart
No herbarium specimen

Images

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Proposed Names

57% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight
ret
54% (1)
Recognized by sight

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Good luck.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2013-11-21 17:52:28 PST (-0800)

Remember that you need a cold night. I’ve tried putting them in the freezer, but I never got the timing right. You might put a bunch in a freezer and take one out every 15 minutes and see if you ever get a lavender reaction. :)

Rod

Thanks Rod!
By: DCart
2013-11-21 17:20:33 PST (-0800)

I was thinking that it may be Amanita citrina. It was found amongst Pine. At least I was shooting in the right direction. :)

There were more, this one just seemed to be photogenic. I may go back tomorrow afternoon and collect them to look for the lavender dashes.

Considering the pallid cap, the form of the bulb, the time of year, etc. …
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2013-11-21 17:01:30 PST (-0800)

This could be one of the citrinoid group for eastern North America. It would be interesting to know if, after a cold night (near freezing), this species develops little lavender dashes or streaks on the cap or stem.

Some photographs of material collected near the South Carolina-Georgia border can be seen here:

http://www.amanitaceae.org?Amanita+sp-lavendula03

Very best,

Rod

Created: 2013-11-21 16:47:07 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2013-11-21 17:50:23 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 28 times, last viewed: 2016-10-23 16:27:57 PDT (-0700)
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