Observation 153858: Entomophthora Fresen
When: 2013-11-26
Who: Kiki (kwf)
No herbarium specimen

Proposed Names

59% (3)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight
56% (1)
Recognized by sight: on Muscidae or Anthomyiidae
Used references: M Hauser, CDFA

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus


Add Comment
By: Byrain
2013-11-28 22:29:36 PST (-0800)

I’m not sure they will be able to tell with such a picture, it might just be a house fly (Musca domestica) though.

By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2013-11-28 21:17:27 PST (-0800)

the more specific, the better. I suppose that was my way of saying “I have nothing more intelligent to say than it looks like a fly.”


By: Byrain
2013-11-28 20:46:54 PST (-0800)

Just to clarify I meant more precise than Diptera. Some species according to this old key I have prefer specific families.

Erynia and Empusa come to mind.
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2013-11-28 17:09:09 PST (-0800)

I am not the best person to ask, but I’m relatively certain than micro is required for (most?) species IDs. conidial arrangement and qualities of conidiogenous cells are of primary importance. I’d never heard of needing to count nuclei before. host ID is also key. this looks like plain old Diptera to me.

someday may we be blessed with a resident entomopathogen expert.

By: Byrain
2013-11-28 08:10:15 PST (-0800)

What other genera are possible? If I understand it correctly to identify Entomophthora to species level we might need information like presence absence of rhizoids, conidia size & the number of nuclei, and a more precise id of the host. As for the nuclei, the literature I have says this.

“Nuclei were counted from primary conidia mounted in DAPI
(5 |il/ml) in fluorescence microscopy at 400 x magnification (filter 0.5;
violet; excitation 395-440).”

Created: 2013-11-28 07:21:11 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2013-12-10 22:12:56 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 58 times, last viewed: 2016-10-23 23:17:43 PDT (-0700)
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