Observation 154265: Hydnum rufescens group
When: 2013-12-05
Collection location: Braga, Portugal [Click for map]
No herbarium specimen

Notes: I don’t think it’s repandum. I find this hydnum every year, on just this small place even in years that I don’t find any Hydnum at all. They have salmon pink or pink caps and the spines are very few, very very tiny and just cover the folding edge of the cap. I only find keys to H. repandum, umbilicatum or rufescens. Under oak.

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True, elsa
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2013-12-23 08:38:15 UTC (+0000)

H. rufescens group is probably the best choice at this stage. There are still rufescens clades out there without descriptions (although they are supposed to be smaller and thinner than magnorufescens).

It’s not
By: Elsa (pinknailsgirl)
2013-12-22 18:12:24 UTC (+0000)

easy to separate by cap colors. But I saw these caps always pink orange. The spines are always orangish, feature with no relevance on keys. In the other observation the cap colors could be easily be confunded between H. repandum, but not the spines which are not decurrent, are smaller (not so small as these, but I’m not sure if they could be eventually the same specie as they are in the same small wood) and also orangish like these.

Hm.
By: Gerhard Koller (Gerhard)
2013-12-22 17:10:55 UTC (+0000)

I got it from a German guy. But not sure about the source. It was in German.
I have an older version too where some species are still completely missing, e.g. magnorufescens.

The translater seems to be Andreas Kunze and some mister called Fischer. I suppose they simply have translated the key you presented ;)

Funny :-)
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2013-12-22 17:03:30 UTC (+0000)

I picked the key from “Two new species of Hydnum with ovoid basidiospores: H. ovoideisporum and H. vesterholtii”.

Where did yours come from, Gerhard?

Here’s a similar key
By: Gerhard Koller (Gerhard)
2013-12-22 16:38:24 UTC (+0000)

1. Fruitbodies very pale, white to creamish, spores very small, 4-5,5×3-4(5)µ – Hydnum albidum
1*. Fruitbodies more intensely coloured, spores larger -2
2. Spores more or less ellipsoid, Qm = 1,55-1,75 – Hydnum ellipsosporum 2*. Spores broadly ellipsoid to (sub)globose -3
3. Spores broadly ellipsoid to ovoid, Qm = 1,24-1,38 -4
3*. Spores ovoid to (sub)globose, Qm = 1,07-1,22 -5
4. Cap with vividly orange tones (mediterran) – Hydnum ovoidesporum f. ovoidesporum
4*. Cap without these colorations, pale ochraceous – Hydnum vesterholtii
5. Underside of cap smooth, without spines (mediterran) – Hydnum ovoidesporum f. depauperatum
5*. Underside of cap with spines -6
6. Fruitbody large (cap diameter mostly > 5 cm), bulky, stipe in relation to cap mostly relatively short, cap normally with pale colours – Hydnum repandum (+ clade RU 1)
6*. Fruitbodies smaller, not so bulky or thinner, cap normally with vivid colours (but not always so) -7
7. Cap umbilicate, spores globose to subglobose, 7,5-10 µ long, therefore normally bigger as in Hydnum rufescens aggr. (northern European collections) – Hydnum umbilicatum
7*. Cap umbilicate or not, spores smaller -8
8. Fruitbodies relatively big, bulky and pale (given in Hydnum rufescens group), morphologically even close to H. repandum, mediterran – Hydnum magnorufescens
8*. Fruitbodies usually smaller, less bulky and thinner, more intensely coloured – Hydnum rufescens (incl. clades RU 2 and RU 4 to RU 6)

However, I doubt Hydnum umbilicatum to occur in Europe. And considerung the clades there are more species that we know by now.

A new key :-)
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2013-12-22 14:33:55 UTC (+0000)

KEY TO THE EUROPEAN SPECIES OF HYDNUM

1. Pileus initially entirely white; spore length 4.9–6.1 my; basidia 5–6.5 my wide . . . H. albidum
1. Pileus initially not white; spore length >7 my; basidia 7.5–12 my wide . . . . . . . . . . 2

2. Basidiospores broadly to narrowly ellipsoid, spores Q-value 1.55–1.75, length 9.8–10.6;
spines often spathulate, at least around the stipe, nondecurrent. . . . . . . . . . . . H. ellipsosporum
2. Basidiospores globose to broadly ellipsoid or not, decurrent or not . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

3. Basidiomata slender, stipe up to 9 mm diam; basidiospores broadly ellipsoid to ovoid,
Q-value 1.24–1.38 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3. Basidiomata slender to robust; stipe up to 20 mm in diam; basidiospores subglobose
to ovoid, Q-value 1.07–1.22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

4. Pileus with deep orange tones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H. ovoideisporum
4. Pileus pale ocher, without deep orange tones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

5. Pileus pale ocher, without orange tinge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H. vesterholtii
5. Pileus with pale orange tinge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H. aff. vesterholtii

6. Basidiomata fleshy; basidiospores Q-value 1.16–1.21 . . . . . . . . . H. repandum and clade RU1
6. Basidiomata slender; if fleshy then basidiospores Q-value 1.16 . . . (H. rufescens s.l.) . . 7

7. Basidiospores length >9 my; spines sharply nondecurrent, spathulate around the stipe and
often paler at the apex; pileus often umbilicate; . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H. aff. ellipsosporum
7. Basidiospores length <9 my; spines not sharply delimited, without strong tendency to be
spathulate; pileus umbilicate or not. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clades RU2–RU6 (6 different clades of rufescens, and one of them is magnorufescens, the rest still unnamed. All are european, but a couple of them have very close relatives in Canada).

Hydnum umbilicatum does probably not exist in Europe, it’s an american species.

Created: 2013-12-05 19:08:25 UTC (+0000)
Last modified: 2013-12-22 13:26:13 UTC (+0000)
Viewed: 151 times, last viewed: 2016-11-07 13:33:49 UTC (+0000)
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