Observation 161436: Oudemansiella sect. Oudemansiella
When: 2014-03-14
0 Sequences

Notes:
Cap viscous and sticky. Several stages of maturity shown. Some immature fruiting bodies are white , others brown. Not sure why this occurs as both are on same dead tree trunk and in close proximity to each other. The specimens are well secured to the host and are difficult to remove. The fruiting bodies have been occurring over the last month which is also surprising. Older decaying/dying specimens were still evident. I have loaded this fungi before but not so well documented. The spores are white from the residue released from the cap.(sticky) Some specimens were as high up the trunk as 3 meters (to 12 meters), and also appearing at roots at base of trunk..Till this point in time I have not seen this species in any of the State Forests or locations that I visit, except for in this single/sole location.

Host Tree identified. (fungi found as high up the trunk as 40feet at canopy level.)

Baloghia inophylla

Baloghia inophylla at the Allyn River, Barrington Tops, Australia. [this area is in the Great Dividing Range approximately 200klms from my find,(Oudemansiella Speg (161436)]

Scientific classification

Kingdom: Plantae

(unranked): Angiosperms

(unranked): Eudicots

(unranked): Rosids

Order: Malpighiales

Family: Euphorbiaceae

Genus: Baloghia

Species: B. inophylla
Binomial name

Baloghia inophylla
G.Forst. P.S.Green1

Synonyms

• Baloghia lucida G.Forst., Endl., P.S.Green
Baloghia inophylla is a rainforest tree of eastern Australia. It is also known as the Brush Bloodwood, as it occurs in brushes, (a nineteenth-century term for rainforest), as well as Bloodwood, as the clear sap is blood red. Other common names include Ivory Birch and Scrub Bloodwood.2

Distribution[edit]
Brush Bloodwood occurs on the eastern coast of Australia from Mount Dromedary (36° S) near Narooma in southern New South Wales to Coen (13° S) in far north Queensland. It also occurs in New Caledonia, Lord Howe Island and Norfolk Island. The habitat is most types of rainforest except the cool temperate forests.
Description[edit]
It is a medium sized tree, reaching 25 metres (82 ft) in height and with a trunk diameter of 50 centimetres (20 in). The trunk is usually cylindrical, though some tree bases are fluted. The bark is creamy brown, with reddish and brown markings. The bark also features raised squarish plates of bark.
Leaves are thick and glossy, 7 to 13 cm long. They are opposite, simple, not toothed, mostly oblong in shape, though at other times elliptical or oval. Identification of this species is made easier when noticing the blunt leaf point and nearly horizontal leaf veins. At the base of the leaf are two swollen glands. Leaf stalks are 8 millimetres (0.31 in) long, and somewhat channelled on the upper side.
Creamy pink flowers occur on racemes in the months of May to January. The five-petaled flower is fragrant, relatively large and attractive. Male and female flowers form on separate racemes.
The fruit matures from February to May, though occasionally at other times of the year. It is a brown roundish capsule 12 to 18 mm long. Inside are three cells, with a single mottled brown seed inside, 8 mm long, although many capsules contain no seeds. Fresh seed germinates reliably, and cuttings strike well.

Images

409009
409010
409011
409012
409013
410121
I returned to this location to check on the fungi previously loaded. The three new images show how the pileus shape is altered during maturity. (For my good friends and consistent helpers Deb and Irene.) I thought this specimen to be particularly attractive, (as far as “rooms” go!.)
410122
I returned to this location to check on the fungi previously loaded. The three new images show how the pileus shape is altered during maturity. (For my good friends and consistent helpers Deb and Irene.) I thought this specimen to be particularly attractive, (as far as “rooms” go!.)
410123
I returned to this location to check on the fungi previously loaded. The three new images show how the pileus shape is altered during maturity. (For my good friends and consistent helpers Deb and Irene.) I thought this specimen to be particularly attractive, (as far as “rooms” go!.)
411293
Gill section at 40 x with melzers reagent.
411294
Gill section at 100 x with melzers reagent.
413157
I have managed to return to this State Forest area again, and have taken two more images of the Fungi, which grows from Base and ground level to approximately 40ft Plus, up the trunk, towards the opening in the canopy. These image were only taken on a 90mm macro lens, but show the incredible height...
413158
I have managed to return to this State Forest area again, and have taken two more images of the Fungi, which grows from Base and ground level to approximately 40ft Plus, up the trunk, towards the opening in the canopy. These image were only taken on a 90mm macro lens, but show the incredible height...

Proposed Names

29% (1)
Recognized by sight
54% (3)
Recognized by sight: Oudemansiella australis?

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Deb – Micrograph ?

Deb, When I prepared the slide I “pressed” the small top slide down on the “Fresh” undried specimen?. Maybe this action caused the “smashed together” effect. I will do a micrograph on the dried specimen in the next day or so, time permitting. Thanks for the encouraging and “constructive”! comments as always.
Is there a reason behind micrographing “Dried” specimens please, and what are your thoughts on me using a (chemical) ice pack, to preserve “wet” specimens in the field till I return home? Thankyou for the link. (GREAT info). It was interesting, and the pores do like similar, although spaced, and not “smashed together”! lol.kk

great news, Ian!
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2014-03-26 10:07:14 CDT (-0500)

What a trouper you are!

Hope that your new drier produces the results that you seek, and I hope that this species gets named after YOU!

your micrograph shows round spores all smashed together, which is producing odd angles.

Here is another series of micrographs showing round spores from the Genus Oudmansiella, from Jacques Boyer at CEMAchampignons:

http://tinyurl.com/l7vplro

Herbarium Specimen

Deb and Irene. I wasn’t going to let it beat me. I went back to the location and managed to retrieve two more smaller specimens. Dryer arrived also today and its in use. I didn’t dry all of the last lot of Oudemansiella specimens. I micrographed a section of the gill, (40x and 100x), and used melzers reagent. The spore seem to be 6 sided, but not sure how revealing my micrographs are.
The flattened sides could be distortion in the magnification, although it seems to be the same at both levels of magnification.

can’t save ’em all…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2014-03-25 10:42:43 CDT (-0500)

at least we have some stellar photo documentation, and can easily recognize it the next time!

Aww
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2014-03-24 06:46:54 CDT (-0500)

what a pity.. Let’s hope that you will get the opportunity to pick a new collection.

Herbarium specimen

Specimen failed to dry properly and has been destroyed as of no value now.
UPDATE TO DRIED SPECIMEN >>>>>>>>>>> New dried specimen now available.

Karen Hughes email reply.

Hi Ian,

Ron said that it was, in his opinion, an Oudesmansiella but he can’t identify it from photos. He would need to do microscopic work or get DNA. We have only limited material from Australia and it could easily be an undescribed species. Karen


From: Ian Dodd (aka kundabungkid) [mailto:iedodd@bigpond.com]
Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2014 4:49 PM
To: Hughes, Karen W
Subject: Re: MyCoPortal occurrence Oudemansiella Speg. REPLY

Karen. Thankyou for your time and assistance. Really difficult getting much in Oz on seldom published Fungi.

I am a Photographer first and an amateur mycologist 2nd, self taught and in a remote area of Australia’s East coast ranges without much support locally but get exceptional assistance from MO. (Mushroom Observer.) Any info will be much appreciated. Kind Regards, Ian Dodd [aka kundabungkid] (www.kundabungkid.com)

From: Hughes, Karen W

Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2014 11:11 PM

To: kundabungkid

Cc: Petersen, Ronald H ; Matheny, P Brandon

Subject: RE: MyCoPortal occurrence Oudemansiella Speg.

I’ll forward this to Ron Petersen and Brandon Matheny. Maybe they can help.

Karen Hughes


From: kundabungkid [mailto:kundabungkid@kundabung.com.au]
Sent: Saturday, March 22, 2014 8:04 PM
To: Hughes, Karen W
Subject: MyCoPortal occurrence Oudemansiella Speg.

Hi, Just an interest contact for your comment on a Fungi specimen from Australia for ID. Please see Mushroom Observer Obs :http://mushroomobserver.org/161436 Any assistance or comments will be appreciated. Thanks Ian Dodd aka kundabungkid (NSW, Australia.)

Irene

I have emailed Teresa tonight 22nd March. Will have to wait and see if she contacts me.

Ian
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2014-03-22 04:57:44 CDT (-0500)

Maybe Teresa Lebel will be able to help out with a name for this..?
Interesting to see the many shapes of one single species!

lovely documentation, Ian…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2014-03-21 10:56:05 CDT (-0500)

of a very interesting and unusual mushroom throughout its development.

So glad to have you as our ace OZ documentarian. : )

nice find, Ian!
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2014-03-15 10:26:07 CDT (-0500)

again. ;)

Created: 2014-03-15 02:58:07 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2017-07-11 17:56:28 CDT (-0500)
Viewed: 230 times, last viewed: 2017-11-01 23:59:48 CDT (-0500)
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