Observation 162780: Russula Pers.
When: 2014-04-03

Notes: Found semi loose in disturbed soil. Possibly animal diggings had disturbed fungi habitat. Bruce Fuhrer description is deprecated.:Thaxterogaster sp.
Largest body 2cm x 1.5cm

Images

413211
413212
413411
This image is at 40 x spores appear to have spikes external to the main body.
Wet slide, no reagent used on this micrograph..
413413
Two images, both at 100 x (objective),using melzers reagent. First micrograph of cropped image of spores. 2nd image of face edge of sectioned specimen showing some type of branching I presume. Over to the experts. Once again out of my realm.Hope the micrographs prove fruitful.! Measured spores to...
413414
Two images, both at 100 x using melzers reagent. First micrograph of cropped image of spores. 2nd image of face edge of sectioned specimen showing some type of branching I presume. Over to the experts. Once again out of my realm.Hope the micrographs prove fruitful.!

Proposed Names

-1% (3)
Recognized by sight: Spores should be examined in Melzer’s
24% (3)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: Spores should be examined in Melzer’s
4% (2)
Used references: NATS Field Guide To Selected North American Truffles and Truffle-like Fungi. Hydnangium is host-specific to Eucalyptus, and has hitch-hiked wherever Eucalyptus has been outplanted. Oregon is likely too cold for it, but it is common in California.

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Just blew my Hydnangium thesis to heck.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2014-04-04 23:34:33 CDT (-0400)

Spores are smaller than almost anything we have in NA. Probably not Hydnangium, at least in the NA sense. Spores of our only species, Hydnangium carneum have spores 10-18 microns, globose, spiny. (From NATS Field Guide To Selected North American Truffles and Truffle-like Fungi) These spores are half the size our Hydnangium carneum.

Spores sort of similar to Arcangeliella camphorata (spores 8-10.5 microns x 7.5-9.5 microns) and Arcangeliella crassa (spores 8-11 microns x 6.5-8 microns). Not a good fit.

Similarly, Gymnomyces abietis has spores 8-14 × 7-11 microns; Gymnomyces brunnescens has spores 8-12 × 8-10 microns. Again, not a good fit.

Looks like you may have found something new, Ian. Congratulations!

Microscopy

Have loaded three micrographs od a section taken from the cut section of the body.

I did see your note from Bruce Fuhrer.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2014-04-04 20:00:46 CDT (-0400)

Not likely Thaxterogaster.

If stump was eucalyptus, then Hydnangium is possible. Tuber (completely mycorrhizal) often fruit on roots of Douglas-fir locally. I know, I know. It seems that a dead tree would not support any mycorrhizal fungi, doesn’t it. But the fact is a recently deceased tree can still play host to mycorrhizal fungi, especially hypogeous mycorrhizal fungi.

Disturbed soil indicates there was an animal likely foraging for the fungus. Many rarer marsupials in Australia consume large quantities of mycorrhizal fungi, according to Dr. James Trappe and Dr. Teresa Label. Especially not surprising on the west coast of Australia.

Bruce is correct to say Thaxterogaster is something like a truffle. But Thaxterogaster (at least from Oregon) are always terrestrial. Many mycorrhizal fungi in Australia are associated with wood. Some even fruit on the sides of tree trunks, up to 30 meters high.

Need to see the shape and size of spores, to rule out other possibilities.

Dr. Trappe, Dr. Label and other grad students of Trappe, went to Australia about 1992 to check on hypogeous or mycorrhizal fungi. In 2 weeks time, on the west coast of Australia, they found some 300 new species. Twenty years later, I don’t believe these collections have been described in science … yet. I know that a key exists for them at Oregon State University.

Comment for D.B.W.

Daniel, The fungi was found loose in soft disturbed soil in a hollow, base section of a stump. It did not appear to have a root system. Did you see my note from Bruce Fuhrer:
“Bruce Fuhrer description is deprecated.:Thaxterogaster sp.(something like a truffle I thought). I have found a Truffle, but not in this area, although similar in geography. As this area is eucalyptus and rainforest forest, (semi rainforest), I would guess that the stump was eucalyptus or may have even been cedar. This area was logged in the 1950’s -1980’s. Is now a protected area.
I will do some microscopy as soon as I can. I, as you know have a lot to catch up on, and it keeps growing.

Neither Russula nor Lactarius.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2014-04-04 14:17:06 CDT (-0400)

But might be related to those two species. Found near Eucalyptus? If so, maybe Hydnangium (which is related to Laccaria). Loculate. Locules too large to be Cystangium or Arcangeliella, which both have a stipe-like sterile base (pseudostipe?).

Thaxterogaster has a columella (interior stem) or vestigial stipe, and usually has a gaseous odor.

I’m afraid this is one specimen that we’ll need microscopy on, Ian. May be one of the hundreds of Australian sequestrate fungi, or even a species novum.

Any nearby tree species?

Created: 2014-04-04 08:02:02 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2014-05-19 07:55:35 CDT (-0400)
Viewed: 101 times, last viewed: 2016-10-23 08:58:25 CDT (-0400)
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