Observation 170332: Amanita sect. Phalloideae (Fr.) Singer
When: 2014-07-13

Notes: Yellow gills and annulus are likely a result of atmospheric conditions. A post-mature specimen.

Wyoming Valley Mushroom Club foray.

Proposed Names

-29% (1)
Recognized by sight
86% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Used references: See comment.
29% (1)
Used references

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Thanks Dave,
By: groundhog
2014-09-16 22:30:11 BDT (+0600)

We have recieved this material and accessioned it to Rod’s Herbarium. We have scheduled it for DNA sequencing.
-Naomi

The upstanding volval limb and the point at the bottom of the bulb…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-09-10 22:38:18 BDT (+0600)

remind me of taxa such as A. elliptosperma and A. magnivelaris. I will try to find the time to look at the partial veil, which can separate the two species just named. The first has a thin membranous p.v. typical of the Phalloideae. Amanita magnivelaris has a thicker, somewhat felted, imperfectly white (more cream) p.v.

Very best,

Rod

Interesting, Naomi.
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2014-09-10 20:08:32 BDT (+0600)

It seems several different types of Destroying Angels occur at Moon Lake Park.

The county wants to timber this county-owned property. Some folks, including me, shall mount a campaign to thwart this effort.

Hi Dave,
By: groundhog
2014-09-10 03:28:57 BDT (+0600)

Rod suggests that the form of the volva and the pointed stem base suggest elliptosperma or magnivelaris. Thanks for sending it, we plan on sequencing for DNA.
-Naomi and Rod

Created: 2014-07-16 07:09:18 BDT (+0600)
Last modified: 2014-09-11 07:42:24 BDT (+0600)
Viewed: 53 times, last viewed: 2016-02-21 19:42:17 BDT (+0600)
Show Log