Observation 170378: Radulodon Ryvarden

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Fruiting at margin and on hymenium of last years Stereum ostrea. Perhaps this is an example of why S. ostrea appears to be an associate of so many wood inhabiting fungi: it provides internal empty pathways for colonization of other species.
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Fruiting at margin and on hymenium of last years Stereum ostrea. Perhaps this is an example of why S. ostrea appears to be an associate of so many wood inhabiting fungi: it provides internal empty pathways for colonization of other species.

Proposed Names

14% (3)
Recognized by sight
45% (2)
Eyes3
Recognized by sight

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Thanks
By: Terri Clements/Donna Fulton (pinonbistro)
2014-07-17 21:43:15 EDT (-0400)

for the explanation.

Terri

pinonbistro
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2014-07-17 21:36:19 EDT (-0400)

Hydnaceae sensu lato and Hydnaceae are not synonymous. The former is a throwback, shorthand term for when Hydnaceae contained any toothed fungi. The latter is the much more specific family you describe in your comment. The same applies to virtually all the sensu lato names in use on (and off) the site.

S. pachyodon is pileate, and its “teeth” are more elongated, jagged pore mouths than individual spines. in high macromorphological speak, this could be said to be irpicoid (from Irpex) rather than truly denticulate.

Radulodon
By: Terri Clements/Donna Fulton (pinonbistro)
2014-07-17 21:30:52 EDT (-0400)

looks promising—in my earlier comment before this name was proposed I was questioning Hydnaceae as a promising name.

Terri

Danny,
By: Terri Clements/Donna Fulton (pinonbistro)
2014-07-17 21:25:21 EDT (-0400)

According to Wikipedia: “All species within the Hydnaceae are believed to be ectomycorrhizal, forming a mutually beneficial relationships with the roots of living trees and other plants. Basidiocarps typically occur on the ground or in leaf litter in woodland” and “The fruit bodies of species in the family have caps and stems that are usually centrally attached.” Since this obs is on wood Hydnaceae doesn’t seem likely to me. I suppose Hericiaceae or Hericium is a possibility: “Species in this genus are white and fleshy and grow on dead or dying wood; fruiting bodies resemble a mass of fragile icicle-like spines that are suspended from either a branched supporting framework or from a tough, unbranched cushion of tissue.” To me this obs seems more like Kuo’s description of S. pachyodon: “sometimes merely a spreading pore surface; sometimes with a folded-over edge of a cap; sometimes with poorly to well developed caps,” he goes on to say the spines are like flattened teeth and up to 10 mm long (12 mm according to Rogers.

Terri

compare with Observation 148227
By: Danny Newman (myxomop)
2014-07-17 21:18:33 EDT (-0400)
Thanks Terri
By: Martin Livezey (MLivezey)
2014-07-16 21:37:59 EDT (-0400)

Great discovery for me!

Created: 2014-07-16 07:33:03 EDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2014-07-17 21:31:33 EDT (-0400)
Viewed: 137 times, last viewed: 2016-11-29 17:32:17 EST (-0500)
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