Observation 181213: Pholiota granulosa (Peck) A.H. Sm. & Hesler
When: 2014-09-30
( 1800m)
No herbarium specimen

Notes: On hardwood.

Spores smooth, with a small but visible germ pore. Pleurocystidia not observed. Cheilocystidia difficult to observe, subcapitate, ovoid, cylindrical and clavate. Stipe without caulocystidia and with abundant clamp connections.

Pileipellis elements 24 – 50 × 8.5 – 12.5 µm, with many asperulate terminal elements, dark reddish brown in KOH.

Spore stats:

6.1 [6.8 ; 7.5] 8.3 × 3.9 [4.1 ; 4.3] 4.5 µm
Q = 1.4 [1.6 ; 1.8] 2 ; N = 10 ; C = 95%
Me = 7.2 × 4.2 µm ; Qe = 1.7

6.97 4.23
7.01 4.02
7.37 4.15
7.36 4.31
7.93 4.17
6.62 4.41
7.14 4.05
6.34 4.38
6.95 3.96
8.15 4.18

Images

463868
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463869
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463870
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463871
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463872
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463873
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466578
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Spores and basidia 1000x
466589
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Cheilocystidia 400x
466590
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Cheilocystidia 400x
466591
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Pileipellis scalp section 100x
In phloxine and KOH
466592
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Pileus trama 100x
466593
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Pileus trama 100x
466602
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Spores 1000x
With an astrosclereid that fell off of a plant
466664
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Pileipellis 400x in KOH
466665
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Pileipellis terminal cell

Proposed Names

-79% (2)
Recognized by sight
22% (2)
Recognized by sight
40% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Used references: North American Species of Pholiota by Smith and Hesler – page 61
Based on microscopic features: Spores with a very small germ pore, ellipsoid in face view and bean shaped in side view. Terminal pileipellis elements often asperulate. Cylindrical cheilocystidia observed. No pleurocystidia. Basidia yellowish. Clamp connections abundant.
-5% (2)
Recognized by sight
Based on microscopic features: pileipellis.
-92% (2)
Based on microscopic features: Spore size match, pileipellis match, cheilocystidia match

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Do Flammulaster species have a germ pore?
By: Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
2014-10-08 18:45:59 PDT (-0700)

These spores do have a germ pore, though it is very small.

no…
By: Richard and Danielle Kneal (bloodworm)
2014-10-08 18:26:25 PDT (-0700)

it just means, that it is likely a species of Flammulaster, i just don’t know which one…
pretty much, what every “genus level” proposal is on MO.

you can vote, you know…
or…suggest something else.

your call…

Alan
By: Rocky Houghtby
2014-10-08 18:03:55 PDT (-0700)

The pilepellis is completely wrong for F. erinaceellus, which has subglobose hyphal elements that Smith describes as isodiametric. The hyphae in your micrographs are often four or more times longer than they are wide. There are several species near P. granulosa that you could consider, although P. granulosa is the strongest possibility based off of your observations of spore size and pilepellis type.

Flammulaster as a genus level suggestion doesn’t make sense for ANY observation. The current accepted taxonomy for “Flammulaster” is derived from a concept that places the group in the Inocybaceae (based entirely on spore color). Recent molecular studies of the agarics place “Flammulaster” and “Phaeomarasmius” beside Naucorioid species of Tubaria and Gymnopilus in a clade much less directly related to Inocybe as previously assumed. Species level suggestions are perfectly valid, but genus level suggestions of Flammulaster are literally meaningless.

Pileipellis
By: Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
2014-10-08 17:25:23 PDT (-0700)

A few of the terminal cells were very finely asperulate, but most were smooth. I didn’t see anything that stuck out as being pileocystidia. I added some better pileipellis pics. The spore size measurements matched Flammulaster erinaceellus better than they matched Pholiota granulosa.

Did you
By: Rocky Houghtby
2014-10-08 14:58:20 PDT (-0700)

See any pileocystidia that looked like this?

http://mushroomobserver.org/image/show_image?id=425732&obs=167123&q=2Ftrh

The pilepellis in P. granulosa should be composed of long chains of interwoven hyphae with some conspicuously asperulate terminal cells. The cheilo should range from pyriform to utriform.

Created: 2014-10-02 09:06:27 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2014-10-09 06:54:49 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 102 times, last viewed: 2016-10-21 05:59:23 PDT (-0700)
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