Observation 181411: Paxillus involutus (Batsch) Fr.
When: 2014-10-01
No herbarium specimen

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By: Erlon (Herbert Baker)
2014-10-06 18:01:42 CDT (-0400)

Here is a new observation by zaca that shows the same color KOH reaction. http://mushroomobserver.org/181563?q=2FIyu

That could be too.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2014-10-05 18:06:27 CDT (-0400)

I haven’t seen Singer’s nor McNabb’s work.

I think when Douglas-fir and Monterey pine were introduced into Australia and Tasmania, many fungi hitch-hiked their way at the same time.

Hi Daniel
By: Erlon (Herbert Baker)
2014-10-05 14:39:51 CDT (-0400)

Thanks. I noticed that also. I got KOH reaction info from McNabb, R.F.R. (1969). The Paxillaceae of New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Botany 7(4): 349-362 http://virtualmycota.landcareresearch.co.nz/...

Perhaps it is the same as the New Zealand species. Singer thought that P. involutus was likely introduced to the southern hemisphere.

I have just learned through an internet search
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2014-10-05 13:16:59 CDT (-0400)

that Paxillus involutus is a European species, and not believed to be found in the U.S. For European Paxillus involutus KOH should produce a grayish reaction.

More correct is to call this Paxillus involutus complex.

The red staining with KOH is interesting, and suggests a different species as well, at least in NAMA. Apparently red KOH reaction can be a positive test for polyporic acid, at least in Hapalopilus rutilans (=Hapalopilus nidulans), and Pleurocybella porrigens. Pleurocybella porrigens was generally considered a safe edible until this data was reported. Now not so sure.

See http://www.namyco.org/toxicology/poison_syndromes.html

Created: 2014-10-03 12:55:23 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2014-10-03 13:10:59 CDT (-0400)
Viewed: 52 times, last viewed: 2016-10-25 17:02:27 CDT (-0400)
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