Observation 181823: Amanita sect. Lepidella sensu Bas
When: 2014-10-06

Notes: Growing in sandy soil in mixed sandhill/sand scrub habitat. Close proximity to oak, pine, and palmetto. Most of the stem was submerged, and the end tip broke off when I pulled it up. Strong, unpleasant odor like ammonia or very old, dry decomp. I will update with spore print photo tomorrow.

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Proposed Names

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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It looks as though there was probably a lot more to the bulb that didn’t make it….
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-10-06 19:34:17 CDT (-0500)

I’d try “magniradix” first.

Rod

Don’t wait too long for a spore print.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2014-10-06 19:32:47 CDT (-0500)

It’s already been drying in the field. The spores are going to get smaller and smaller as time passes…more and more likely to be atypical of the species. A long thing radicating base suggests A.magniradix” in the eastern U.S. But bulb variability leads to other possibilities: rhopalopus, longipes, subsolitaria, rhoadsii, maybe others. Spores that are near normal (they can be gotten off the gills without a spore print) would be very helpful in starting an ID process.

Here is another thought: rhoadsii does not have a well-developed pileipellis.

In his thesis (1969) Dr. Bas emphasized the anatomy of the volva, the presence or absence of clamps on the base of basidia, and spore size and shape.

Very best,

Rod

Created: 2014-10-06 18:00:17 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2014-10-06 18:07:46 CDT (-0500)
Viewed: 23 times, last viewed: 2015-12-02 15:58:26 CST (-0600)
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