Observation 18258: Pluteus Fr.
When: 2008-07-19
No herbarium specimen

Notes: cap 3/8 inch wide.

[admin – Sat Aug 14 02:04:08 +0000 2010]: Changed location name from ‘Ohio Dawes’ to ‘Dawes, Ohio, USA

Proposed Names

45% (5)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
.
By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2009-02-13 22:31:05 PST (-0800)

According to Paul Stamets “Psilocybin Mushrooms of the World”, 4 species including P. salicinus are also active:
P. cyanopus
P. glaucus
P. villosus

Wikipedia lists an additional 2:
P. brunneidiscus
P. nigroviridis

P. salicinus its group.
By: John Plischke (John Plischke)
2009-02-13 19:30:36 PST (-0800)

I have been wondering for a long time how many things that i have been calling P. salicinus really are it. I see very small ones, small ones and last year I even found a P. cervius sized one that also bruised blue. I have been thinking are there other bluing Pluteus species that either I am not aware of or that we lump them together. Regreatiably I do not have a good book on them. If i ever find one I will be sure to get it.

Created: 2009-02-13 15:07:21
By: (CureCat)
Summary: .

P. salicinus often does not bruise blue. If it does, it is usually subtle, though larger collections seem to show more distinct discolouration, where as the smaller mushrooms are more indistinct.
Most of the collections I have made have a more generalized blue/green hue to the stipe and they have looked a lot like this one except with a shorter stipe. They were also typically smaller specimens, as this one appears to be.

Furthermore, the pileus of some specimens are often silvery grey and distinctly streaked or split. Others tend to have a much less split or cracked cuticle, and some are granulose near the apex.

All of these variations I have observed have been given the name P. salicinus, but perhaps they represent more than one species, or maybe they are simply just variations.

.
By: Erin Page Blanchard (CureCat)
2009-02-13 15:07:21 PST (-0800)

P. salicinus often does not bruise blue. If it does, it is usually subtle, though larger collections seem to show more distinct discolouration, where as the smaller mushrooms are more indistinct.
Most of the collections I have made have a more generalized blue/green hue to the stipe and they have looked a lot like this one except with a shorter stipe. They were also typically smaller specimens, as this one appears to be.

Furthermore, the pileus of some specimens are often silvery grey and distinctly streaked or split. Others tend to have a much less split or cracked cuticle, and some are granulose near the apex.

All of these variations I have observed have been given the name P. salicinus, but perhaps they represent more than one species, or maybe they are simply just variations.

.
By: John Plischke (John Plischke)
2009-02-12 20:38:13 PST (-0800)

It did not bruise blue.
John

Blue?
By: Dan Molter (shroomydan)
2009-02-12 08:27:47 PST (-0800)

I think I see some blue on the stem just below the cap, but otherwise this does not look much like what I have been calling P. salicinus in Ohio.

salicinus?
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2009-02-12 08:07:05 PST (-0800)

what macro-characters are you using to seperate this pluteus out?

Created: 2009-02-11 20:39:42 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2011-01-12 15:53:05 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 110 times, last viewed: 2016-05-18 05:21:35 PDT (-0700)
Show Log