Observation 185577: Ingvariella bispora (Bagl.) Guderley & Lumbsch
When: 2014-10-25

Notes: Not much information on this species. [but see comment below] Of my references it is only mentioned by Noble and in McCune’s Miscellaneous Keys as "on siliceous roc, montane to alpine in semi-arid climates: with a broad world distribution; known from Wyoming. He doesn’t mention Noble’s specimen.
Noble collected it as Diploschistes bisprorus on “HCl- sandstone at a maritime site on Saltspring Island” [not far from Lopez Island]
The North America Checklist has both D. bisporus and I. bispora in boldface as accepted names, but apparently the former should appear in normal font as a synonym.
Here’s Fernandez-Brime et al. – http://www.mycologia.org/content/103/4/755.full

Images

474108
474109
474110
474111
474112
474113
KOH
474114
KOH
474115
KOH
474116
KOH
474117
H2O
474386
on Chadwick HillI. bispora on rock ledge in left of person in photo

Proposed Names

83% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Used references: Noble, W. J. (1982) The Lichen Flora of the Coastal Douglas-fir Dry Subzone of British Columbia. Ph.D. Thesis, University of British Columbia, Reprinted and nomenclaturally updated in 1996 by Bruce McCune with per mission of the author.;
McCune, Bruce (2007) Miscellaneous Keys to Microlichens of the Pacific Northwest of North America;
T. L. Esslinger (2012) A Cumulative Checklist for the Lichen-forming, Lichenicolous and Allied Fungi of the Continental United States and Canada, Vers. 19
Based on microscopic features: spores 2/ascus, muriform, brown at maturity, ave 46 × 22u

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Thanks for looking!
By: Richard Droker (wanderflechten)
2014-11-12 19:04:34 EST (-0500)

Thanks Jason.

Great observation
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2014-11-10 16:41:31 EST (-0500)

I wish I had something useful to contribute.

I don’t have access to the original description of the genus:

Guderley, R., H.T. Lumbsch and G.B. Feige. 1997. Ingvariella, a new genus in the Thelotremataceae (lichenized Ascomycotina). Nova Hedwigia 64: 147-154.

Bruce Ryan has very little to say on the subject:

Differs from Diploschistes in lacking a true exciple.

Ingvariella bispora (Bagl.) Guderley & Lumbsch
Spores 1-2 per ascus, hyaline to brownish, broadly ellipsoid, 5-12-septate transversely, 2-5-septate longitudinally. Thallus uniform, tightly attached, rimose-areolate, matt to shiny, gray to brown, not pruinose; aroeles 0.2-1.6 mm diam., to 1 mm thick, irregularly polygonal, flat. Apothecia urceolate, sunken, to 1.3 mm diam., roundish; disc blackish, slightly pruinose; proper exciple blackish, 70-100 um thick, pseudoparenchymatous; hymenium 90-120 um high; hypothecium hyaline, 10-15 um; paraphyses simple, flaccid, 1-1.5 um thick; asci cylindrical, 80-110 × 15-30 um. Thallus K-, C-, P-. UV- (no substances). On siliceous rocks, montane to alpine in arid or semi-arid areas. Wyoming, British Columbia, possibly Washington.

I notice that he, also, says nothing about perispores.

The one pictured in the French site has an extremely broad perispore — maybe it’s just very faint because it’s so diffuse?

perispore?
By: Richard Droker (wanderflechten)
2014-10-29 09:39:52 EDT (-0400)

A photo at http://naturainneustria.blog.fr/... showa a perispore. Using india ink I could not find this. Don’t know how significant this is.

Additional references with descriptions – Lumbsch in Nash III, T.H., Ryan, B.D., Diederich, P., Gries, C. and Bungartz, F. (eds) (2004) Lichen Flora of the Greater Sonoran Desert Region, Volume 2 (see at http://eol.org/pages/198796/overview including map which shows most specimens collected in southeast Australia and Greece) and Galloway, D. J. (2007) Flora of New Zealand, Lichens – do not mention perispore. Suspect the Natura In Neustria photos are something else (also show only 1 spore/ascus)

Created: 2014-10-25 21:55:59 EDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2014-10-29 20:25:51 EDT (-0400)
Viewed: 133 times, last viewed: 2017-07-17 14:09:48 EDT (-0400)
Show Log