Observation 189269: Scleroderma polyrhizum (J.F. Gmel.) Pers.
When: 2014-11-15
Who: zaca
No herbarium specimen

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The trees
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2014-11-25 13:20:46 PST (-0800)

in obs. 188745 are willow I believe. Willow support several mycorrhizal fungi, including Tuber species. While I have never found Scleroderma associated with willow in Oregon, my collecting under that species is limited. I don’t think I’ve ever intentionally looked under willow.

NATS does have one specimen of Tuber with willow at 13,000-14,000 feet elevation, so it does happen. (Colorado? I think) While your shrubs may seem like shrubs where you are, in Alaska they are tundra trees at 2-3 feet in height.

Hi Daniel,
By: zaca
2014-11-25 11:11:52 PST (-0800)

I don’t think we have S. hypogaeum here, at least and never heard that name and no reliable checklist exists. These looked like the more mature versions of those I found at the same place some three weeks before. These in particular lived at the margins of an artificial lake, where no trees exist only shrubs like those you can see at the last photo of observation 188745 (image 482662). I didn’t took any sample of it.

Host tree?
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2014-11-24 19:42:59 PST (-0800)

This resembles S. hypogaeum, zaca. The nearly buried aspect of the sporocarp; the thick peridium, with the surface breaking into reddish-orange to reddish-brown plates; and the curious structure which reminds of the capitate columella in Radiigera.

Radiigera is related to Geaster, but never opens up. It has both conifer and hardwood hosts.

Microscopy?

In Oregon, S. hypogaeum is usually found under conifers. Sclerodermas as a group are so widespread they could be found with any tree species.

Created: 2014-11-22 15:57:12 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2014-11-22 15:57:38 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 51 times, last viewed: 2016-11-09 01:48:57 PST (-0800)
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