Observation 196274: Pluteus Fr.

When: 2015-01-14

Collection location: Sanborn County Park, Saratoga, California, USA [Click for map]

Who: Christian (Christian Schwarz)

Specimen available

Notes:
The stipe was an amazing but difficult-to capture mix of yellow, blue, and green.
The older stipes were darker bluish-gray, young ones more yellow, intermediate age ones more green.

On decaying tanoak bark chunks. Fairly numerous.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Ditto
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2017-12-23 13:19:52 PST (-0800)

Django’s remarks.
I can’t think of any Pluteus in our area that is more host specific beyond preference for conifer or hardwood. Certainly the overwhelming majority of oak and tanoak bark-decomposers species cross over.
Likewise, degree of blue staining totally informative in light of state of knowledge.
Bluing Celluloderma im native habitat makes phaeocyanopus most likely. I’ll add what I’ve got for micro and sequences, but I don’t know if a type sequence exists for phaeocyanopus.

Looks like something in sect. Celluloderma and not sect. Pluteus
By: Django Grootmyers (heelsplitter)
2017-12-23 12:57:31 PST (-0800)

Almost definitely not P. brunneidiscus. There is a P. brunneodiscus but it’s seems to be only known from Kerala in India so far. P. phaeocyanopus seems likely but micro would confirm. I don’t think the ecology or amount of bluing are reliable characteristics to rule P. phaeocyanopus out currently given how poorly documented the species is so far.

phaeocyanopus not found on tan bark oak.
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2017-12-23 11:20:07 PST (-0800)

it also only blues at the base of the stipe.
no micro data.

no species ID.

description here: https://www.pnwfungi.org/...

Did you check the spore shape?
By: Alan Rockefeller (Alan Rockefeller)
2017-10-11 13:11:39 PDT (-0700)

This also seems to match the description of Pluteus brunneodiscus, described from a 1902 Earle collection from Redding. That species has ellipsoid spores while P. phaeocyanopus has nearly globose spores.

did Else ID these?
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2015-01-23 10:26:06 PST (-0800)

nice collection.

Main Pic
By: Mushroom Viper
2015-01-18 06:57:36 PST (-0800)

It’s nice.

Created: 2015-01-14 18:33:41 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2017-12-26 11:47:00 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 1058 times, last viewed: 2018-05-20 18:09:56 PDT (-0700)
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