Observation 197005: Rhizopogon Fr. & Nordholm
When: 2015-01-25
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Next to Eucalyptus tree. Pine trees about 10m away.

Proposed Names

-32% (2)
Recognized by sight
44% (2)
Recognized by sight: Rhizomorphs on outer peridium; loculate.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus


Add Comment
Hard like a carrot
By: Lucy (lucya)
2015-01-25 15:17:27 PST (-0800)

when I cut them in half. I’ll try freezing one if I come across more. I dried one… but I assume the smell would be different to what it would be had I frozen it. Oh, also, they seemed to have grey goo in the middle when I squeezed them. If I find another one I will make sure I take a pic of the goo as I squeeze.

Were the pine trees
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2015-01-25 07:14:16 PST (-0800)

over 10 meters tall? Pine roots extend outward for at least as far as the tree is tall. And can go near or even underneath other trees. Thus what appears to be sometimes isn’t.

Rhizopogons are a kind of catch-all genus, at least as first described by Smith. The original collections were a source of wonder and befuddlement. Some have since been allotted their own genus (Alpova); others are awaiting DNA comparisons.

Rhizopogons are loculate (chambered) while Alpova have gel-filled chambers. Freeze a mature Rhizopogon and you get a mildly fruity flavor when thawed. Freeze an Alpova diplophloeus, and upon thawing you smell something quite similar to Bailey’s Irish Creme. (I highly recommend this stage!)

Very hardl Rhizopogon? That seems odd. Most I’ve collected are fairly soft, like softened cold cream cheese or slightly harder.

In Smith’s original sense, Rhizopogons included some 300 species…

All of them seem to be black inside…
By: Lucy (lucya)
2015-01-24 18:17:41 PST (-0800)

They are also very hard (much harder then the rhizopogons I’ve come across here).

Hi Daniel!
By: Lucy (lucya)
2015-01-24 17:51:15 PST (-0800)

Yes, pine trees about ten metres away. But it was right next to the Eucalyptus tree base, less than 1cm… It looks different to the usual rhizopogons here but you are probably right. I’ll see if the younger ones are white inside.

While Eucalyptus may have been nearby,
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2015-01-24 17:40:32 PST (-0800)

I know of no Rhizopogons associated with Eucalyptus. Were there any other hardwoods are (more likely) pine trees nearby, Lucy?

Created: 2015-01-24 16:04:29 PST (-0800)
Last modified: 2015-01-24 18:12:53 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 110 times, last viewed: 2016-10-28 11:54:21 PDT (-0700)
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