Observation 202775: Phyllotopsis nidulans (Pers.) Singer
When: 2015-04-12
No herbarium specimen

Images

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Proposed Names

-2% (2)
Recognized by sight
28% (1)
Recognized by sight
56% (1)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: I found a specimen from last winter farther along the log
Used references: Kuo

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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At last
By: Matt Welter (mattfungus)
2015-04-17 07:58:50 PDT (-0700)

Going doing the same log I found one specimen that was still wet. What I believe these are a Phyllotopsis nidudlans specimens that overwintered and dried in the sun and the one specimen I found stayed under the snow and out of the sun until I found them. This whole group is on the same log which is less than 3 feet long and less than 4" in diameter. It is heavily rotting and covered in moss. I think that the snowpack and regular decomposition of the fungus compressed the gills into the mosses. The dried cap has now green parts to it which does make it a non-lichen.

Excellent opportunity
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2015-04-15 14:23:39 PDT (-0700)

If it’s a lichen, it will be perennial, so it should still be in perfect condition. Try grabbing a small piece and looking at a section under the dissecting or compound scope. Most lichens will show clear stratification with a green layer (grass green to forest green, but opinions differ on lichen colors!). Under the compound scope, you will see obviously green to brownish-green or bluish-green cells mixed in with the generally hyaline hyphae. It should be an open-and-shut case.

If it’s gone, or withering, or otherwise shows nothing green inside, then time to reconsider nonlichenized fungi…

jason lichen
By: Matt Welter (mattfungus)
2015-04-15 14:12:50 PDT (-0700)

some of my UW people are wondering if it could be a lichen, either cyanobacteria or Umbilicaria?

I’ve scanned your pics, don’t think so, but can’t get in your head. I will be out at the site tomorrow afternoon and will be getting better pics including the underside and attachment.

Just trying to determine whether it could be saprobic or not…
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2015-04-15 10:38:53 PDT (-0700)

Thanks!

yes
By: Matt Welter (mattfungus)
2015-04-15 10:34:07 PDT (-0700)

though I would categorize it more as a branch about 3-3.5 inches in diameter or at least a remanant root. But very mossy.

Is it on a mossy rotting log?
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2015-04-15 08:42:19 PDT (-0700)
It’s really throwing me
By: Matt Welter (mattfungus)
2015-04-15 08:34:29 PDT (-0700)

I just sent a note out this morning to our state plant expert because the thing it is reminding me the most of is water lilies, but the area that it is in is an ephemeral river bed. I am total flumoxed.

Not like anything I’ve seen
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2015-04-15 08:25:10 PDT (-0700)

Can’t tell if it’s lichenized or not by these photos, of course, but it doesn’t look anything like anything I’ve ever seen. (And that’s starting to count for something, haha!)

Created: 2015-04-14 11:16:21 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2015-04-17 09:39:44 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 114 times, last viewed: 2015-09-20 07:07:12 PDT (-0700)
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