Observation 203673: Xanthoparmelia lineola (E.C. Berry) Hale
When: 2015-05-02
(35.4631° -120.6753° 277m)
Who: J-Dar
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Sandstone boulder used as parking block.

Foliose, light yellow-green lichen, roundish shape overall, lacking soredia or isidia, apothecia common, disk dark burgundy brown to blackish, lobes overlapping, >1mm wide, shiny and smooth, with blackish margins. Thallus underside pale to tan, brown at lobe tips, rhizines somewhat sparse, pale in center, black and more common near lobe tips, simple. Medulla white. Thallus K+Y (maybe), KC+Gold (Usnic acid), medulla K+Y turning dark red (salazinic acid).

Nash Xanthoparmelia key couplet 59 asks about the lobulate nature of central thallus lobes. There are two specimens photographed for this Observation, and lobulate condition seems different between the two. The first specimen (Photos 1-3) has sparse apothecia and the thallus seems lobulate in the center. The second specimen (Photos 4-6) has dense apothecia and seems less lobulate. In the field I assumed the first was less mature.

In order to get to Xanthoparmelia lineola it needs to be not or sparingly lobulate. The remaining three species don’t fit well though, either based on range or morphology: Xanthoparmelia somloensis, Xanthoparmelia coloradoensis, and Xanthoparmelia digitiformis_.

Proposed Names

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Used references: Nash Sonoran V.2

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Comments

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Agreed
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2015-05-03 10:20:15 EDT (-0400)

No way this is digitiformis, and stenophylla (=somloensis) is apparently rare on the west coast. Leaving coloradoensis and lineola. Both of these specimens are clearly far more like lineola than (typical) coloradoensis. The latter species is usually very loose and imbricate. And never has such abundant apothecia as the second specimen.

Created: 2015-05-02 21:30:57 EDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2015-05-03 10:17:40 EDT (-0400)
Viewed: 27 times, last viewed: 2017-02-19 22:55:18 EST (-0500)
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