Observation 203896: Coprinellus flocculosus (DC.) Vilgalys, Hopple & Jacq. Johnson
When: 2015-05-04
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Fresh cluster came up today in the “mushroom pile” area of our yard. We have a corner of the yard where our young persimmon sapling is growing that has become the mushroom spot for all old or inedible fruiting bodies for the last few seasons(corner fence w/very little sun exposure). This week the species happened to be small mica caps against the fence. I have found Geastrum spp., Rhizopogon app., Marasmius oreades, Lycoperdon, Scleroderma and multiple species of Agaricus in our yard so far in the last two seasons. Not positive, but pretty convinced our throwing of these wild species in the urban setting have brought them up over time at this current location.

There are three distinctly different mica caps that fruit in Yakima, WA throughout the year from my personal observation; A very small version that looks identical to the West side of WA fruiters(thin long stem, shiny., a floccose version that is much stouter and shorter(caps are almost not visible due to paper thin floccose skin surrounding fruitbodies, and finally, this species that exhibits the mica dust on cap AND the flocking on margins and young fruit bodies.

I’m looking forward to seeing what other species of fungi will show up and out compete local fungal residents in the yard – hopefully, most of them will come up throughout the remainder of this Spring/Summer season in our ever evolving “mushroom spot.”

Elevation: 1500ft.

Temp: 78, sunny. Low 80’s over the last three days.

UPDATED 5/8/15: Images of fully mature specimens four days after beginning of visible flush. The caps still exhibit the tenuous flocculant(with striation) behavior as with C.flocculosus, but also have mica looking dust on young specimens. I am leaning more toward C.flocculosus after updated growth5/8. Very large at maturity- fully expanded caps approx. 4cm wide.

Updated 5/29/15: Notes below each additional image.

UPDATED 6/12/15: New satellite of primordial young buttons coming up in caespitose lumps near the ever growing persimmon. This strains mycelium has gone down the fence in three different directions for over a month now. Whenever I water, they pop up to spread more spores.

Species Lists

Images

519505
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519507
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519508
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519979
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UPDATED 5/8/15: Four days after initial fruiting was discovered – the caps are almost 4cm wide, striations and dry “white flocking remnants” visible. Young specimens still exhibiting “mica” expression on caps.
519980
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UPDATED 5/8/15: Four days after initial fruiting was discovered – the caps are almost 4cm wide, striations and dry “white flocking remnants” visible. Young specimens still exhibiting “mica” expression on caps.
519981
IMG_0778.JPG
UPDATED 5/8/15: Four days after initial fruiting was discovered – the caps are almost 4cm wide, striations and dry “white flocking remnants” visible. Young specimens still exhibiting “mica” expression on caps.
519982
IMG_0780.JPG
UPDATED 5/8/15: Four days after initial fruiting was discovered – the caps are almost 4cm wide, striations and dry “white flocking remnants” visible. Young specimens still exhibiting “mica” expression on caps.
524940
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Updated 5/29/15. Satellites of mycelium have gone down our fence towards the newly planted Persimmon sapling-back and forth in small clustered fruiting for over a month now. Pretty rad to see how the mycelial mind seeks out new locations for lignin, chitin, etc. during its fruiting cycle.
524941
IMG_1514.JPG
Updated 5/29/15. Satellites of mycelium have gone down our fence towards the newly planted Persimmon sapling-back and forth in small clustered fruiting for over a month now. Pretty rad to see how the mycelial mind seeks out new locations for lignin, chitin, etc. during its fruiting cycle.
524942
IMG_1511.JPG
Updated 5/29/15. Satellites of mycelium have gone down our fence towards the newly planted Persimmon sapling-back and forth in small clustered fruiting for over a month now. Pretty rad to see how the mycelial mind seeks out new locations for lignin, chitin, etc. during its fruiting cycle.
527015
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UPDATED IMAGES6/12/15: New central satellite(where the fruiting first started). Mycelial networks traveled back and forth with fruitings over last month-approx. 5 ft. in length.
527016
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UPDATED IMAGES6/12/15: New central satellite(where the fruiting first started). Mycelial networks traveled back and forth with fruitings over last month-approx. 5 ft. in length.
527017
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UPDATED IMAGES6/12/15: New central satellite(where the fruiting first started). Mycelial networks traveled back and forth with fruitings over last month-approx. 5 ft. in length.
527018
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UPDATED IMAGES6/12/15: New central satellite(where the fruiting first started). Mycelial networks traveled back and forth with fruitings over last month-approx. 5 ft. in length.

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Comments

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No problem Judi!
By: Drew Henderson (Hendre17)
2015-06-04 14:23:50 CDT (-0400)

Thank YOU for contributing such clear and concise observations at MO :-)

Love your style!

Fungally,

Drew

Drew, thanks for taking the time to share all that information.
By: Judi T. (AvidAmateur)
2015-06-04 12:33:29 CDT (-0400)

I read it with great interest and feel a little more educated on the subject of Coprinellus now.

Perhaps some of the flocculent ones are C. flocculosus
By: Jacob Kalichman (Pulk)
2015-05-05 19:32:48 CDT (-0400)

Created: 2015-05-05 18:13:08 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2015-06-12 14:13:37 CDT (-0400)
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