Observation 208107: Butyriboletus brunneus (Peck) D. Arora & J.L. Frank
When: 2015-06-26
No herbarium specimen

Notes: No discernible taste. did not bruise blue on stipe. However, these were hemlock/beech/birch woods, not oak woods

Proposed Names

1% (2)
Recognized by sight
28% (1)
Recognized by sight: Looks like Butyriboletus brunneus. But this type should bruise prominently blue on the stipe.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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B. brunneus looks possible
By: Rob (gourmand)
2015-06-30 05:56:38 CEST (+0200)

I did see a few blue tinges on the stipe, but I couldn’t reliably reproduce these. I figured they had been created accidentally by contact with another mushroom in the bag. Looking at the description of this mushroom, which escaped my notice, brunneus seems like the best guess so far. If you will, check out the other observation I created with a very similar mushroom and see if you agree it is also the same species. I just added the name B. brunneus to that one as well. Thanks!

Rob,
By: I. G. Safonov (IGSafonov)
2015-06-30 05:16:45 CEST (+0200)

Your bolete is a distinct one by virtue of colors and fine reticulation. Unless it’s a novel species, it should be one of the five I suggested. I have excluded B. speciosus from consideration because of the cap color.

I can taste bitter…
By: Rob (gourmand)
2015-06-30 05:07:05 CEST (+0200)

I wouldn’t have mentioned that I didn’t taste bitterness if I couldn’t taste it in general. I’ve tasted many bitter boletes over the years. I just did quick google search, and it appears that bitterness sensing is highly variable from person to person. So I suppose it is remotely possible that I just couldn’t taste the bitter this time.
These red and yellow boletes are tremendously difficult. Thanks for your suggestions!

Well,
By: I. G. Safonov (IGSafonov)
2015-06-30 04:45:24 CEST (+0200)

Before considering species options, it would be useful to know whether or not Rob can taste bitterness in general (I recall that something like 20% of males lack the gene for that).

Bitter-tasting species: C. calopus, C. inedulis, C. peckii, and C. roseipes. Some of these can probably be eliminated based on the habitat.

Mild-tasting species: Butyriboletus brunneus (I think I see some faint bluing on the stipe), and B. pseudopeckii.

What are the
By: Christian (Christian Schwarz)
2015-06-30 03:37:29 CEST (+0200)

Caloboletus options out there?
Sound like Rob did not get a bitter reaction.

Created: 2015-06-29 15:16:32 CEST (+0200)
Last modified: 2015-06-30 05:57:02 CEST (+0200)
Viewed: 63 times, last viewed: 2016-10-28 18:18:16 CEST (+0200)
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