Observation 209620: Lactarius Pers.
When: 2015-07-11
Herbarium specimen reported

Notes: Maximum cap size about 1 to 1.5 cm. Growing in mosses, some attached to small sticks.

Off-White Spore Print.

UPDATE:

Spore print was scant but I could see that it was probably ivory, not pure white.

Added spore images. Taken in H2O w .1% Teepol substitute for wetting.

The first spore was measured as indicated in the photo notes ( you have to hold your mouse of the image to see the notes ).

Outer measurement – 8.1 micron X 8.1 micron – see marked image.

Inner measurement – 6.9 micron X 6.3 micron – Q = 1.10 see marked image

Images

537322
20150711-PANO2_2015P1000122.jpg
537483
20150711-PANO2_2015P1000120.jpg
537703
Silkey_PANO2_2015P1050561.jpg
Spore images 1-3: 1000x – Focus a little in front to show ridges. First measurement ellipse shows how measurement was made, max and min elliptical diameters inclosing ornaments. Second measurement – inside ornaments
537704
outer Silkey_2015P1050561.jpg
Spore images 1-3: 1000x – Focus a little in front to show ridges. First measurement ellipse shows how measurement was made, max and min elliptical diameters inclosing ornaments. Second measurement – inside ornaments
537705
inner Silkey_2015P1050561.jpg
Spore images 1-3: 1000x – Focus a little in front to show ridges. First measurement ellipse shows how measurement was made, max and min elliptical diameters inclosing ornaments. Second measurement – inside ornaments
537710
20150712-PANO2_2015P1050550.jpg
Spore Image 4 – 1000x – no in-line filter shows slight golden color.
537711
20150712-PANO2_2015P1050574.jpg
1000x – green glass filter – change to B&W
537712
20150712-PANO2_2015P1050566.jpg
1000x – green glass filter – change to B&W
537714
20150712-PANO2_2015P1050557.jpg
1000x – green glass filter – change to B&W
537715
20150712-PANO2_2015P1050554.jpg
1000x – green glass filter – change to B&W

Proposed Names

-15% (4)
Recognized by sight: Seems to be lignocolous. Hygrophorus roseibrunneeus?
59% (6)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight
-73% (3)
Recognized by sight
Used references: North American species of Hygrophorus / L.R. Hesler [and] Alexander H. Smith

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Spore images added – Lactarius?
By: L G Price (LG_Price)
2015-07-12 12:28:59 PDT (-0700)

I guess the shape, ridges, warts make this Lactarius.

Spore PHotos – TBD
By: L G Price (LG_Price)
2015-07-12 09:41:51 PDT (-0700)

I’ll get that done later today.

Re: comments on attachment to woody debris
By: L G Price (LG_Price)
2015-07-12 09:12:47 PDT (-0700)

Thanks for the comments. Very helpful, I don’t have years of experience actually looking at these things.

For L G: Usually Lactarius don’t.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2015-07-12 09:06:42 PDT (-0700)

But under certain circumstances, most mycorrhizal fungi will use coarse woody debris as a water reservoir to fruit on.

Most Lactarius not umbonate.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2015-07-12 08:59:03 PDT (-0700)

This observation has 2 specimens with obvious umbonate caps. Lactarius usually have a central cap depression, not umbonate, therefore not likely. (Sorry, Walt.) Lactarius are mostly mycorrhizal and this obs. appears to be growing on wood. A nearby species could be mycorrhizal and still be using the degrading wood as a water reservoir, so that is not definitive. Also notice the thick white rhizomorph in one of the photos.

Both the cap and gills appear waxy, hence the term “Waxy Caps” for Hygrophorus.

Don’t think Lactarius grows on sticks
By: L G Price (LG_Price)
2015-07-12 08:49:28 PDT (-0700)
compare to H. speciosus Pk. reference
By: L G Price (LG_Price)
2015-07-12 08:22:53 PDT (-0700)

NOTES for Ref North American species of Hygrophorus / L.R. Hesler [and] Alexander H. Smith

page 277, species 165

Seems to match this best of anything I can find. The principal differences are that the gills do not descend down the stem quite as far as the one shown in the text (description – adnate-decurrent), the cap diameters are at the small end of the size range , text does not say it grows from wood.

Yes, growing from wood
By: L G Price (LG_Price)
2015-07-12 07:52:43 PDT (-0700)

While some appear to be growing from moss, others are attached to small bits of wood.

Need to be careful with notes, L G.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2015-07-12 04:09:48 PDT (-0700)

While this observation does appear to be growing with mosses, I would (wood?) say it is growing from wood. It seems to be lignicolous: an important feature when considering species.

Created: 2015-07-11 20:54:18 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2015-07-12 14:05:59 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 107 times, last viewed: 2016-10-23 00:14:25 PDT (-0700)
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