Observation 210725: Amanita sect. Amanita
When: 2015-07-19
No herbarium specimen
0 Sequences

Notes:
These mushrooms (and a few other similar specimens) were found in heavily wooded area, composed primarily of older coniferous trees. Soil is fairly sandy, and the ground is covered in moss, along with sparse grass, marshy vegetation, and many blueberry plants nearby. All specimens were found growing from the ground.

Top of cap was a little slimy, there seemed to be a very narrow hollow running up the middle of the stem. Gills were very fine.

Images

540412
P7190310.JPG
540410
P7190307.JPG
540411
P7190308.JPG
540413
P7190311.JPG
540414
P7190313.JPG
540415
P7190315.JPG
540416
P7190316.JPG

Proposed Names

-45% (2)
Recognized by sight
31% (2)
Recognized by sight
56% (1)
Eyes3
Recognized by sight: The striate cap margin and marginate to limbate basal volva point away from flavoconia.
28% (1)
Recognized by sight: More yellow and lacking in volval deposits on the cap, compared to frostiana I have seen.

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
Hello, David.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-07-23 16:37:15 CDT (-0400)

Thank you for your email regarding this collection. The volva on the top of the bulb is rather like that of frostiana, although I don’t remember seeing a free limb on frostiana before. The cap is unusually yellow for frostiana. With all the warts missing and a very slippery cap, it strikes me that there might have been a rain after this mushroom appeared above ground. In that case, some pigment may have washed away. Apparently, the specimen was not retained.

I looked into the old Peck name you mentioned (Amanita frostiana var. palllidipes). The only description we have is the original one. Jenkins gave an interpretation to which he added some information from the type material. The color is said to be white to pale yellow. The spore measurements are (roughly speaking) ellipsoid. I have thought, in recent years, that Peck’s variety might be the same as A. multisquamosa.

Because of the cap color being so intense in this material, I’d be disinclined to apply pallidipes in this case.

Very best,

Rod

Created: 2015-07-19 23:46:17 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2015-07-20 12:47:23 CDT (-0400)
Viewed: 76 times, last viewed: 2017-06-20 11:38:35 CDT (-0400)
Show Log