Observation 211196: Megacollybia Kotl. & Pouzar
When: 2015-07-21
No herbarium specimen

Notes: On the ground in oak woods.

No noticeable spore drop after 30 hours.

Images

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541733
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First two micros are a smash mount of gill material. I believe the clavate/inflated cells are cheilocystidia. They appear to match those expected with M. rodmanii.The third micro (last) is a mount of material form the pileipellis. This appears to be a cutis, which also agrees with M. rodnamii. But ...
541795
First two micros are a smash mount of gill material. I believe the clavate/inflated cells are cheilocystidia. They appear to match those expected with M. rodmanii.The third micro (last) is a mount of material form the pileipellis. This appears to be a cutis, which also agrees with M. rodnamii. But ...
541796
Third (last) micro is a mount of material form the pileipellis. Appears to be a cutis, but elements are substantially wider than the 4-9 mu widths reported by Mushroom Expert.

Proposed Names

19% (3)
Recognized by sight
36% (6)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight
-29% (4)
Recognized by sight

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Comments

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Dave,
By: I. G. Safonov (IGSafonov)
2015-07-23 17:30:26 UTC (+0000)

I think that the caps of our mushrooms are identical in terms of the texture, color and pattern. I still think that rodmanii is a stretch for both…

Igor, your mushroom…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2015-07-23 16:51:32 UTC (+0000)

from last summer looks very similar to M. rodmanii. Although, as you say, occurrence in a strictly coniferous habitat creates some doubt.

I just checked Rogers Mushrooms, and Phillips says that the cheilocystidia for M. rodmanii are “swollen, pear shaped.” This is a very good match for what is seen in the first two micro photos.

Maybe this is just a partially dried M. rodmanii. But the very short/squat stipes and the occurrence on fairly hard-packed mossy ground still make me wonder.

If you zoom in on the photo of the gills and look very closely, some connecting veins appear to be present.

Dave,
By: I. G. Safonov (IGSafonov)
2015-07-23 16:26:00 UTC (+0000)

Your mushroom looks very similar to what I collected in the Pine Barrens settings last summer. We had a discussion about it, too. We agreed it could be a Megacollybia, but to me the species ID was more elusive. See:
http://mushroomobserver.org/169679?q=2cDuX

Thank you all…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2015-07-23 15:19:48 UTC (+0000)

for your interest in this observation. Mushrooms do look like Megacollybia, but stature, texture, and habitat seem to point away from M. rodmanii. Although the texture may be explained by the hot/dry conditions at the time when these were found/collected.

Looking at the Megacollybia key at Mushroom Expert I see something very interesting. An uncommon species, M. subfurfuracea, is said to have large cheilocystidia and pileipellis with thick terminal cells. So I’m wondering if this information matches this observation.

My skills and understanding associated with micro analysis are quite limited. Any suggestions on interpreting what is seen in the accompanying micros would be appreciated.

Hi Dave!
By: Claude Kaufholtz-Couture (Claude Kaufholtz-Couture)
2015-07-23 13:45:03 UTC (+0000)

We should see these few points:
Odor and flavor of parsley.
Oak presence.
Fibrillose hat.
Bulbous stem.
cKc

this is
By: Eva Skific (Evica)
2015-07-23 12:21:25 UTC (+0000)
Megacollybia
I don’t think this is a Russula.
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2015-07-23 12:15:31 UTC (+0000)

The stipe did not break (snap) cleanly, somewhat fibrous.

I don’t think this is Megacollybia.
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2015-07-23 05:08:46 UTC (+0000)

I see hundreds of M. rodmanii every year. This seems different. Short stipe not as fibrous as Megacollybia did not penetrate the soil very deeply. The spot where these were found had no woody debris near the surface. These appeared to be truly terrestrial.

I’ll see if micro yields anything useful tomorrow.

Created: 2015-07-23 03:54:39 UTC (+0000)
Last modified: 2015-07-23 16:51:57 UTC (+0000)
Viewed: 105 times, last viewed: 2016-10-27 20:49:29 UTC (+0000)
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