Observation 216246: Amanita brunnescens G.F. Atk.
When: 2015-09-16
No herbarium specimen

Notes: specimen in the dryer for Tulloss

Proposed Names

60% (2)
Eyes3
Recognized by sight: “Star foot” with brown stain.
28% (1)
Recognized by sight: Looks like A. brunnescens, except with membranous patch arhered to lower stipe.

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
You’re welcome.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-09-19 21:48:02 CDT (-0400)

Very best,
Rod

You’re welcome.
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-09-19 21:47:58 CDT (-0400)

Very best,
Rod

excellent
By: Geoff Balme (geoff balme)
2015-09-19 14:09:59 CDT (-0400)

So much learning here, thank you gentlemen!

That is really interesting, Rod.
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2015-09-19 09:49:34 CDT (-0400)

At least I can feel a little better when my own state of confusion has an historical precedent :-)

As usual, thanks for taking the time to share your knowledge of all things Amanita.

For many years in the 19th Century and very early 20th, eastern North…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-09-19 09:23:39 CDT (-0400)

American books and articles identified A. brunnescens as A. phalloides. Part of the justification for this was that there is sometimes a submembranous patch of volva at the stipe base in brunnescens. In the old Thomas field guide, there is a copy of a Mary Eaton illustration (several mushrooms shown on one page in a style that was commonly used by Eaton in plates originally published in the early days of Mycologia when it was edited by W. A. Murrill). In this illustration the depiction of phalloides is easily recognized (nowadays) as brunnescens with “phalloides bulb and volva” at the base of the stem.

I vote for brunnescens in the present case.

Very best,

Rod

For many years in the 19th Century and very early 20th, eastern North…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2015-09-19 09:23:29 CDT (-0400)

American books and articles identified A. brunnescens as A. phalloides. Part of the justification for this was that there is sometimes a submembranous patch of volva at the stipe base in brunnescens. In the old Thomas field guide, there is a copy of a Mary Eaton illustration (several mushrooms shown on one page in a style that was commonly used by Eaton in plates originally published in the early days of Mycologia when it was edited by W. A. Murrill. In this illustration the depiction of phalloides is easily recognized (nowadays) as brunnescens with “phalloides bulb and volva” at the base of the stem.

I vote for brunnescens in the present case.

Very best,

Rod

Thanks again, sir!
By: Geoff Balme (geoff balme)
2015-09-16 21:19:11 CDT (-0400)

Prof. Tulloss will have it in hand soon and will probably be able to tell us about the spore!

someday I hope to have my own microscope, but at this rate that maybe a ways off. :)

Well, Geoff…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2015-09-16 19:42:13 CDT (-0400)

Like most fungal genera, Amanitas can be tricky. Looking at this one a second time, the basal bulb seems a bit small for phalloides, but the greenish tinge seen on the cap surface (possibly the tendency on my computer monitor, or your camera) reminds me of phalloides. I have found phalloides here in PA a few times. I don’t know if it’s been recorded in NC.

Having written all of this, another possibility occurs to me. I’ll adjust my proposal/confidence.

Thanks Dave!
By: Geoff Balme (geoff balme)
2015-09-16 16:35:51 CDT (-0400)

I"m being extra reserved about my Amanita IDs these days as everything I thought I knew has dissolved in the MO expertise.

Thank you for this ID

At first glance…
By: Dave W (Dave W)
2015-09-16 13:58:38 CDT (-0400)

this looked to me like a clear example of burunnescens… “cleft foot” (vertically split basal bulb), brown stain on the base, grayish cap with innate radial streaks. But in the one photo I see what may be the remains of a limbate volva, a patch of white membranous material adhering to the lower stipe. So I don’t feel comfortable completely dismissing the possibility this may represent Amanita phalloides, which would be a very interesting find in NC.

But I really think it’s brunnescens.

Created: 2015-09-16 12:21:21 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2015-09-19 09:50:09 CDT (-0400)
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