Observation 21725: Tuckermannopsis sepincola (Ehrh.) Hale
When: 2009-05-12
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Identification: This is an interesting lichen quiz: Are the two lichens in this picture the same species? … and what are they?
First answer: No, they are clearly different.
Second answer: Well … look at the little amber bit on the right hand side of the clump. It actually does seem to resemble the uppermost starburst lichen to some extent.
Third answer: Note that the apothecia on the little amber bit are marginal, as in Tuckermanopsis, but the apothecia on the starburst lichen are laminal. Also the apothecial margins are different in the two lichens, and of course one is a clump and the other is a starburst. I think the clump is Tuckermanopsis sepincola, and the starburst is Melanohalea septentrionalis (Note that its apothecia march right out to the thallus margins).

Comments welcome!

Common names: chestnut wrinkle-lichen (Tuckermanopsis sepincola) and northern brown-shield (Melanohalea septentrionalis)

Proposed Names

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Used references: Hinds and Hinds, 2007, pp.474-477

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Comments

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These are hard, aren’t they?
By: Jason Hollinger (jason)
2009-06-05 12:09:47 PDT (-0700)

Bear in mind that Tuckermannopsis sepincola is likely destined to be split off from Tuckermannopsis, and that historically, both Melanelia and Tuckermannopsis were all lumped into Cetraria sensu lato. Trevor has shown me T. sepincola that looked just like a Melanelia (e.g., the flat one in the upper right of your photo). I wouldn’t even hazard a guess without some spot tests and a good hard look at the underside! :) T. sepincola is also very specific in its habitat, at least around here, growing only on shrubs around the edge of ponds(!)

Created: 2009-06-05 11:26:51 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2010-08-13 20:40:21 PDT (-0700)
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