Observation 223500: Lepiota (Pers.) Gray
When: 2015-11-20

Notes: Two small (& I believe mature specimens), oval to round shaped fungi covered by debris on Eucalyptus rain forest floor. Stipes short and sharply tapered. I do not think these specimens open up when mature. Bodies full when cut. No staining occurred. Possibly have loadedsomething similar in the past.* Please note: Some additional added images. Also JPG 604 displays internal structure revealed by insect damage and an unknown Grub/insect is shown on the fungi face also. Dried collection available and can be mailed if requested for confirmation of ID.

Species Lists

Images

577510
577511
577512
577513
579032
Added images to existing MO Obs. I believe the added images are exactly the same and were located 6 days apart at the same exact location. I do not find this species in any other location from many I visit. I have also included an image of the fine root system attached to the stipe. I was unable t...
579033
(JPG 606 only Damaged) (and as found). Added images to existing MO Obs. I believe the added images are exactly the same and were located 6 days apart at the same exact location. I do not find this species in any other location from many I visit. I have also included an image of the fine root syste...
579034
Added images to existing MO Obs. I believe the added images are exactly the same and were located 6 days apart at the same exact location. I do not find this species in any other location from many I visit. I have also included an image of the fine root system attached to the stipe. I was unable t...

Proposed Names

1% (2)
Recognized by sight
47% (2)
Eye3
Recognized by sight
23% (3)
Eye3
Recognized by sight
58% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: remarkably similar to a newly desribed rainforest truffle lepiota i described a few years ago

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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truffle lepiotoid?
By: Teresa (truffleladyTeresa)
2015-11-29 17:59:46 CST (-0500)

Hi folks, thanks for contacting me about this particular truffle. It looks quite similar in external and internal texture to a newly (2yrs ago now, time flies) described lepiotoid truffle from mixed euc rainforest in northern nsw. We did not have many collections (less than 4), so it would be wonderful if this turns out to be the same species, and even more exciting if it s novel one! I would love to see some material to confirm this. Greta photos by the way.
Please send collection (s) to the RBG-Victoria herbarium?
cheers Teresa

Thanks for the personal email, Ian.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2015-11-28 16:13:37 CST (-0500)

I’d like to say I could possitively ID this with a specimen in hand. I’d like to say that, but the reality is I don’t have a strong enough concept of Australian fungi. I’m pretty sure Dr. Teresa Label will, however. I have met Teresa when she was a graduate student with Dr. Trappe. I’m pretty sure she will come to an accurate conclusion on this.

Further ID

I have emailed Teresa and will share her comments on reply. Thanks to all who have participated. kk

Additional images added. Please comment and check notes.

Daniel, have additional notes and images for further possible ID. Thanking you kk.

Many more locules
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2015-11-27 20:05:01 CST (-0500)

in your later photos, Ian. And the gleba seems to be darker…maybe more mature. I would send these to Dr. Theresa Label in Australia, who has been working with Dr. James Trappe there. She may have a better concept of what this might be than anyone in the US. Sorry, don’t know here email or mailing address.

Too many locules to be Tuberales (except for the sole
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2015-11-23 18:55:54 CST (-0500)

exception known: Tuber wheeleri). I’m going to be VERY interested in what species this is determined to be, Ian. Because there are several locules, I think it must be considered Basidiomycota sensu lato for now, but I’d be happy to change my vote.

Replt for Daniel

completely terrestrial. I was careful to dig deep and in a wide circle of the stipe without disturbing the soil attached to the fungi. It was in no way attached to rootes, dead decaying wood, or any other rotten debris.

I think you are right, Ian.
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2015-11-22 22:55:26 CST (-0500)

These look like sequestrate fungi, meaning that the spores are kept on the inside of the sporocarp. Looks like there is considerable mycophagy, perhaps by insects?

You state these were found on the forest floor, but were they found on rotting wood (could be buried)? Or were they completely terrestrial?

Created: 2015-11-21 05:11:54 CST (-0500)
Last modified: 2015-11-29 18:03:45 CST (-0500)
Viewed: 94 times, last viewed: 2016-10-23 10:51:44 CDT (-0400)
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