Observation 22359: Amanita Pers.
When: 2009-05-17
No herbarium specimen

Notes:

[admin – Sat Aug 14 02:04:39 +0000 2010]: Changed location name from ‘Pipeline Track, Mt Wellington, Tasmania’ to ‘Pipeline Track, Wellington Park, Tasmania, Australia’

Proposed Names

78% (4)
Eyes3
Recognized by sight

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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re
By: noodle_snacks
2009-06-24 20:00:46 PDT (-0700)

I will return as soon as I get a chance (not to keen on walking in the pouring rain right now), and see if I can find anything. If not I will go back at the same time next year.

soil…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2009-06-21 06:57:17 PDT (-0700)

Yes, Andreas, I see black organic material from the substrate on the bulb in the top picture. On the other hand, in the lower picture I see a clay color or sandy clay on the exposed surface of the lower part of what seems to be a large bulb.

If the reddish color on the wart tips and the top of the bulb is not from the soil, then I suppose it is an oxidation reaction of some kind. Rusty reddish or ochraceous or pinkish staining is not uncommon in subsect. Solitariae Bas (e.g., A. eijii Zhu L. Yang, A. subcokeri Tulloss nom. prov., or A. advena Tulloss et al.)

Noodle snacks, you may want to go back and see if a more mature specimen might be present. For a furriner to diagnose a white Australian lepidella from a photograph is very difficult…possibly, not possible. I think that dried material of a specimen old enough to be producing spores (cap fairly wide open, but no sign of decay) would be necessary. If the species is thick fleshed, then it should cut up in order for it to dry relatively quickly and thoroughly. Diagnostic photographs of a bulb or bulbs, the gills and short gills (lamellulae), gill attachment to stipe, and surface pattern on the warts (e.g., tiny grooves running down the sides of conical warts), etc. would be very helpful, also.

Very best,

Rod

Very best,

R.

red soil?
By: Andreas Gminder (mollisia)
2009-06-21 05:48:03 PDT (-0700)

ret: I gather the soil is reddish and is the source of the red-orange “stains” on the volval warts and the sides of the stipe’s bulb. Is this correct?

To me it don’t looks like as if the soil there would have red colour. It looks instead quite blackish …

re: more questions..
By: noodle_snacks
2009-06-21 04:34:32 PDT (-0700)

Well I guess Amanita Harrisonii would be the obvious choice. I don’t know enough to decide on a more descriptive name.

It was photographed about a month ago. Would it be worth returning now? I know exactly where it was and there were a number of specimens, so I may be able to get one in a years time if they aren’t available now. I would have submitted the photos for identification much closer to the date if I didn’t have exams hanging around.

re: more questions..
By: noodle_snacks
2009-06-21 04:30:22 PDT (-0700)

Well I guess Amanita Harrisonii would be the obvious choice. I don’t know enough to decide on a more descriptive name.

It was photographed about a month ago. Would it be worth returning now? I know exactly where it was and there were a number of specimens, so I may be able to get one in a years time if they aren’t available now. I would have submitted the photos for identification much closer to the date if I didn’t have exams hanging around.

I suspect the muddy brown part is part of the bulb. I’m not an expert however.

more questions…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2009-06-20 12:32:22 PDT (-0700)

I gather the soil is reddish and is the source of the red-orange “stains” on the volval warts and the sides of the stipe’s bulb. Is this correct?

In the lower photograph, is the muddy colored region below the upper part of the stipe’s bulb a part of the bulb or a lump of the substrate?

This is a very interesting Amanita. There are not many taxonomic studies on amanitas from Tasmania. I don’t think that the number of Tasmanian species of Amanita is known with much confidence. I’d be very interested if noodle snacks can enlighten us on the subject. N.S., do you have any thought about a potential name for your photographed species?

Conical warts are not common outside of sect. Lepidella; however, there’s at least one species with such warts in sect. Amanita and a small number in sect. Validae. All the non-lepidella species with such warts that I can think of are southern or eastern Asian; hence, possibly having a Gondwanan ancestor. Is it possible to find more of this material and preserve it for study?

Very best,

R.

Both growing out of the ground
By: noodle_snacks
2009-06-20 00:02:24 PDT (-0700)

Both growing out of the ground very close to each other.

http://maps.google.com.au/...

Is the location geocoded.

terrestrial?
By: Dan Molter (shroomydan)
2009-06-19 20:25:04 PDT (-0700)

The mushroom in the bottom photo appears to be growing from wood, but the first one looks like its coming up out of the ground. Please tell us more about where you found these beautiful little mushrooms.

Created: 2009-06-19 18:32:50 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2013-12-15 14:56:46 PST (-0800)
Viewed: 161 times, last viewed: 2016-10-28 13:44:04 PDT (-0700)
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