Observation 22479: Amanita Pers.
When: 2009-06-23
No herbarium specimen

Notes: This little Amanita was growing under mixed hardwoods.

Proposed Names

22% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight
18% (3)
Recognized by sight

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
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still wondering about this one
By: Dan Molter (shroomydan)
2009-11-02 13:42:29 PST (-0800)


Specimens sent in July.

It’s a bit like A. frostiana in some ways…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2009-06-23 17:51:04 PDT (-0700)

Just to put an alternative on the table and discourage “A. pantherina group” as a try at a name… Let me suggest that while I have never seen SUCH an ocreate bulb on A. frostiana, I have seen an ocreate bulb on that species. If more of this species is found, a dried specimen could be checked for spore size and shape and for clamps at the base of the basidia. Amanita frostiana has subglobose spores and clamps at the base of the basidia. The clamps are absent from the pantherinoid group and uncommon in the gemmatoid group. Amanita russuloides has broadly ellipsoid to ellipsoid spores according to Jenkins’ type study of it.

Very best,


By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2009-06-23 17:43:26 PDT (-0700)

Jenkins (1977) and Gilbert (1941) and some other folks have considered A. russuloides so close to A. gemmata that they synonymized them. I don’t think that is very likely to be correct; however, I would agree that A. russuloides is gemmatoid rather than pantherinoid. I don’t think it would have an ocreate volva.

Without dried material we’ll never know…

I have collected what might be A. russuloides, but have not had the time to understand precisely what that species is for certain sure. I think it would have a limbate volva, however.

Very best,


Created: 2009-06-23 14:28:23 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2010-07-02 16:15:32 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 101 times, last viewed: 2016-10-27 01:57:18 PDT (-0700)
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