Observation 24069: Lactarius subvellereus var. distans
When: 2009-08-05
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Found in Zone 45 near a large fruiting of Russula laurocerasi, these were much less conspicuous: only five or six of them, almost buried in the duff, smaller and whitish and with clods of dirt on top.

Depressed cap center, general shape, rolled rim, and slightly irregular cap shape to me suggested Lactarius and Russula as possibilities straight away. Breaking the cap edge produced white latex, making the genus identification quite decisively. The final two pictures show the latex; the first was taken immediately and the second ten minutes later. If anything, it started out very slightly yellowish and became whiter, rather than the reverse. More likely there was really no change except in the lighting conditions; it was after seven PM and the sun was only an hour or so away from setting.

Most of them were in a fairly tight grouping, with a few more scattered around.

Trees nearby included Betula allegheniensis, Betula papyrifera, Acer sp., Pinus sp., and Populus tremuloides.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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L. subvellereus sounds right.
By: Dimitar Bojantchev (dimitar)
2009-08-09 01:23:54 BST (+0100)

L. piperatus has very crowded gills, a feature equally present in European and Eastern North American material (does not occur in California). The brown stains and watery droplets are typical for subvellereus as described int he lit. I saw this one in the area when we were walking with Dan Molter.

D.
Correct Noah
By: walt sturgeon (Mycowalt)
2009-08-09 00:45:25 BST (+0100)

Variety subdistans….

isn’t it
By: Noah Siegel (Noah)
2009-08-08 03:24:39 BST (+0100)

Created: 2009-08-07 07:21:28 BST (+0100)
Last modified: 2009-08-07 07:21:28 BST (+0100)
Viewed: 92 times, last viewed: 2016-10-27 10:24:05 BST (+0100)
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