Observation 24607: Amanita rubescens var. alba Coker
When: 2009-08-21
No herbarium specimen

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

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A vote for Dan’s suggestion…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2009-08-25 12:01:31 CDT (-0400)

Dan,

I’m inclined to believe you are right. Consider that Amanita flavorubens has a yellow volva, that A. amerirubescens very often has a yellow volva in very young material, that Coker’s var. alba sometimes is found with yellow volval material on the underside of the annulus, that none of them ever have an annulus that is itself yellow, and that all three are rubescent taxa known largely from eastern North America. This suggests (not conclusively, truth be told…but to me it suggests by “intuition”…something that mycologists shouldn’t act on without more evidence) a possible ancestral linkage between the three taxa. In the Amanita Studies key to rubescent species of sect. Validae, you will note that they DIFFER in spore size and shape as well as the obvious difference in initial cap pigmentation (or lack thereof). Hence, there is a suggestion of divergence based on a few diagnostic factors.

Very best,

R

A vote for Dan’s suggestion…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2009-08-25 12:01:23 CDT (-0400)

Dan,

I’m inclined to believe you are right. Consider that Amanita flavorubens has a yellow volva, that A. amerirubescens very often has a yellow volva in very young material, that Coker’s var. alba sometimes is found with yellow volval material on the underside of the annulus, that none of them ever have an annulus that is itself yellow, and that all three are rubescent taxa known largely from eastern North America. This suggests (not conclusively, truth be told…but to me it suggests by “intuition”…something that mycologists shouldn’t act on without more evidence) a possible ancestral linkage between the three taxa. In the Amanita Studies key to rubescent species of sect. Validae, you will note that they DIFFER in spore size and shape as well as the obvious difference in initial cap pigmentation (or lack thereof). Hence, there is a suggestion of divergence based on a few diagnostic factors.

Very best,

R

hmmmm…looks like a job for…dessicata!
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2009-08-24 21:50:39 CDT (-0400)

do please collect some of this next time if you can, Dan.

maybe a porter along on your photo forays would be helpful? ;)

seems like a distinct species to me.
By: Dan Molter (shroomydan)
2009-08-24 21:15:42 CDT (-0400)

A lot of these pink ones all came up at the same time, when the common form of A. rubescens was not fruiting. I suspect this “variety” is following its own unique evolutionary pathway.

Regarding recombination of var. alba…
By: R. E. Tulloss (ret)
2009-08-24 19:10:53 CDT (-0400)

There are two questions to be answered before Coker’s rubescens var. alba could be recombined with A. amerirubescens. The first is “Is Coker’s rubescens var. alba really a variety of A. rubescens Pers.: Fr.?” The second question is “Is Coker’s rubescens var. alba a variety of anything?” If the answer to the third questions is “yes” (I am presently agnostic on that point), is it a variety of ‘amerirubescens Tulloss nom. prov.’?"

In my opinion, the information to create the recombination is not available, moreover, the name amerirubescens is not published. I would ask that we NOT presume to recombine Coker’s name at the present time.

Very best,

R

Amanita rubescens..
By: Erlon (Herbert Baker)
2009-08-24 15:19:34 CDT (-0400)

..is a European species.

variety pallida.
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2009-08-21 19:47:58 CDT (-0400)

Created: 2009-08-21 19:37:33 CDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2016-08-08 12:06:11 CDT (-0400)
Viewed: 155 times, last viewed: 2016-10-14 22:17:58 CDT (-0400)
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