Observation 24967: Russula Pers.
When: 2009-09-04
No herbarium specimen

Notes: Found in Zone 02 under red pine. (Numerous other tree types nearby, though, including jack pine, quaking aspen, maple, balsam fir, and spruce.)

Size about 5cm across. There were a few scattered throughout a small area near a large old red pine. All the photos are of one specimen.

Proposed Names

75% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: One of the lactarioid ones identified by its form and lack of latex.
42% (2)
Eye3
Recognized by sight
55% (1)
Recognized by sight: Robust,
Flesh hard compact,
Cap dingy colors from white to dark brown or gray,
Gills with intermediates,
Cap margin incurved,
Cap cuticle should be inseparable from cap.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Got interrupted …
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2009-09-06 00:52:24 EDT (-0400)

took another look at the first photo, and do see reddish bruising on the gills, possibly where insects have been eating. Could be R. adusta, but could also be R. compacta in Arora, a species known to fruit in northern climes.

R. adusta
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2009-09-06 00:46:26 EDT (-0400)

in Arora’s Mushrooms Demystified states that the flesh should stain faintly reddish when cut (within 20 minutes). On the damaged edge of this specimen, I can’t see any discoloration.

Gills do have some blackish stains to them, suggesting a very small R. cascadensis, which in my area is always larger than this, but which Arora says may only be 5cm across the cap. Since this specimen fits within that size range, I’d suggest R. cascadensis (even though it hasn’t been reported in your area).

Created: 2009-09-05 00:22:08 EDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2011-02-10 19:11:42 EST (-0500)
Viewed: 21 times, last viewed: 2016-03-22 12:48:59 EDT (-0400)
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