Observation 25973: Chlorophyllum molybdites (G. Mey.: Fr.) Massee
When: 2009-09-27
No herbarium specimen

Notes:

[admin – Sat Aug 14 02:05:11 +0000 2010]: Changed location name from ‘Residential lawn, Belmont, NC’ to ‘Residential lawn, Belmont, North Carolina, USA

Proposed Names

91% (2)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: big, white, growth in lawn, green gills. drive-by ’shrooming at its best!

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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yes, collecting on private property can be awkward…
By: Debbie Viess (amanitarita)
2009-09-30 06:10:26 PDT (-0700)

but the temptation to stop and grab one of these was too much. also, the residents weren’t home at the time. also, it’s a poisonous mushroom, so I was doing them a favor. how’s that for rationalization??!

these are pretty common on lawns in the east in season, love warm weather, and are the most common cause of non-fatal but still nasty mushroom poisoning in North America. Big, beautiful and obvious… you can see how folks would be tempted to eat them! They are pretty rare in Northern CA where I live tho, and this was the first time that I had collected one. I actually just dug one up on the fly (guilt is a great motivator) and staged my shots back at the motel.

The green spores aren’t produced until late in developement; until then, they can be (ahem) dead-ringers for the edible Chlorophyllum rhacodes which has white spores.

Yup.
By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2009-09-29 20:03:22 PDT (-0700)
Are these monsters usualy found in residential areas?
By: kate (kate)
2009-09-29 18:42:04 PDT (-0700)

One can only imagaine what the neighbors must think when a woman pulls ups to the curb of their house with camera and pocket knife in hand. I find this an unusual mushroom. Do many species have green gills like this?

Created: 2009-09-29 16:09:09 PDT (-0700)
Last modified: 2011-10-23 18:28:07 PDT (-0700)
Viewed: 41 times, last viewed: 2016-11-27 21:20:29 PST (-0800)
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