Observation 26697: Gymnopilus junonius (Fr.) P.D. Orton
When: 2009-10-16
Who: hríb
No herbarium specimen

Notes: These were growing in a field under an old oak tree.

Proposed Names

60% (2)
Recognized by sight

Please login to propose your own names and vote on existing names.

Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

Add Comment
they don’t blue
By: Eddee (eddeeee)
2009-10-20 23:47:51 CDT (-0500)

ussually G junonius do not bruise blue. but another species in the PNW bruises blue green is G aeruginosus

no bluing
By: hríb
2009-10-20 22:26:09 CDT (-0500)

I did look for blue bruising on these but none is evident.

well then
By: Eddee (eddeeee)
2009-10-20 20:44:27 CDT (-0500)

If ithas a bitter taste most likely it is G. Junonius or G. spectabilis depending on what mycologist you talk to. Gl validipes has a mild taste to it from my understanding. My voet goes for G. Junonius. Just a side note on the East coast these are known to contain psilocybin and psilocin.

bitter taste
By: hríb
2009-10-20 20:29:13 CDT (-0500)

It does have a bitter taste.

t G spectabilis. group.
By: Eddee (eddeeee)
2009-10-20 19:35:18 CDT (-0500)

I have found G, spectabilis Which I believe has been depreciated to G junonius. growing in this manner around Oaks in West Virginia. The spore prints are Identical to mine. One thing you can do is take a tiny taste see if its bitter.

more pics
By: hríb
2009-10-20 14:47:00 CDT (-0500)

I’ve added four more pictures of these two clusters now that they’ve aged.

substrate
By: hríb
2009-10-20 12:31:40 CDT (-0500)

I did feel something a bit hard while cutting the cluster in half with a knife, but I couldn’t see anything obvious.

Edit: if you look at the 4th picture down it does show a clump of what looks like roots.

substrate?
By: Shane Marsh (Mushane)
2009-10-20 12:03:35 CDT (-0500)

were they growing on roots?

The mushroom war
By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2009-10-16 23:07:54 CDT (-0500)

“If it helps, the flesh of these mushrooms was quite firm, enough so that I had trouble cleanly breaking one off to check the gills.”

Well, that eliminates my dark-horse candidate of either Russula or Lactarius. Stipe would’ve snapped like chalk.

“Doesn’t Quite fit the bill for Opmhalotus so im going to start the mushroom war and call it Gymopilus sp.”

Nah, it’s when you not only vote for your own opinion but also vote against one or more of the other suggestions that you start the mushroom war. :) In this case, nobody had even proposed any other names.

I’ll be back
By: hríb
2009-10-16 21:44:35 CDT (-0500)

There was a second cluster growing about 10’ away that I hadn’t included a picture of. The colors are less saturated in this shot, but I think this cluster also wasn’t as orange as the other.

possibly a Gymnopilus
By: Eddee (eddeeee)
2009-10-16 21:20:06 CDT (-0500)

Possibly a Gymnopilus perhaps growing on buried wood. Doesn’t Quite fit the bill for Opmhalotus so im going to start the mushroom war and call it Gymopilus sp. If you can go back hrib and dig them up and try and get them to open up more and get a spore print.

more info
By: hríb
2009-10-16 21:19:25 CDT (-0500)

If it helps, the flesh of these mushrooms was quite firm, enough so that I had trouble cleanly breaking one off to check the gills. The colors aren’t the same as normal daylight conditions because of the closeup flash (over-saturated).

Interesting.
By: Paul Derbyshire (Twizzler)
2009-10-16 20:59:44 CDT (-0500)

Virulently bright orange and in a dense cluster suggests Omphalotus, but the gills aren’t apparently decurrent.

Not a clue.

Created: 2009-10-16 20:56:49 CDT (-0500)
Last modified: 2009-10-16 20:56:49 CDT (-0500)
Viewed: 526 times, last viewed: 2016-11-22 06:09:54 CST (-0600)
Show Log