Observation 26847: Coprinopsis P. Karst.
When: 2009-10-18
No herbarium specimen

Notes: This specimen was found in my small garden plot outside my apartment which is located approximately 1 mile from the Pacific Ocean in Goleta, California, USA. It stands only about an inch tall. The droopy stems you see to the side of this specimen were standing up when I first noticed it. I ran inside to get the camera and they were already bent over. The stem standing in the picture bent over about a minute after the picture was taken. The tip appeared to be a drop of black liquid. This is in a recently tilled garden with added Kellog’s brand “Garden Soil”. Near this mushroom (if it is in fact a mushroom at all!) there is recently planted garlic (sprouting) and shallots (not sprouting yet).

Images

61129
61259
61260
It looks like based on these recent developments that Coprinellus sp. is most likely (from my amateur point of view).
61261
It looks like based on these recent developments that Coprinellus sp. is most likely (from my amateur point of view).
62313

Proposed Names

-96% (5)
Recognized by sight
59% (2)
Eyes3
Recognized by sight: With the black blob of ‘ink’ at the top and the little brown button at the bottom it’s almost certainly something in the genus Coprinus.
59% (3)
Eye3
Recognized by sight: With the black blob of ‘ink’ at the top and the little brown button at the bottom it’s almost certainly something in the genus Coprinus.

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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Looks stringy…
By: Nathan Wilson (nathan)
2009-10-26 17:37:13 EDT (-0400)

Based on the new images, it looks like the universal veil is stringy rather than granular which say Coprinopsis rather Coprinellus. Species is still hard since there are a lot of them but most field guides will lump them under Coprinus cinereus (most of the common field guides were published before the breakup of Coprinus).

Not necessarily a mushroom per se
By: Daniel B. Wheeler (Tuberale)
2009-10-19 08:29:08 EDT (-0400)

but probably a fungus. I’d suggest Pilobus, which throws off spore capsules to several feet away by osmotic pressue, often found in rich compost. The lack of black caps on the stems already bent over also suggest Pilobus. Neat fungi!

Created: 2009-10-19 02:27:33 EDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2011-09-29 19:20:00 EDT (-0400)
Viewed: 108 times, last viewed: 2016-10-22 12:12:06 EDT (-0400)
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