Observation 27447: Perenniporia fraxinea (Bull.) Ryvarden
When: 2009-09-10
No herbarium specimen

Notes: I found this mushroom growing in a hedgerow on the edge of some disturbed ground (village green). It is approximately eighteen inches in diameter, has white spores, a woody texture and no distinctive smell. There is a smaller specimen growing within two ft of the main one.
Any help with identification would be greatly appreciated.

[admin – Sat Aug 14 01:58:57 +0000 2010]: Changed location name from ‘Burgh le Marsh, Lincolnshire, UK’ to ‘Burgh le Marsh, Lincolnshire, England’

Proposed Names

-69% (6)
Recognized by sight
49% (3)
Eye3
Recognized by sight: Adding this name since it’s about all I can be sure of without checking some literature.
-39% (5)
Recognized by sight
61% (3)
Eye3 Eyes3
Recognized by sight: Well, that’s what remains after excluding everything else..

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Eye3 = Observer’s choice
Eyes3 = Current consensus

Comments

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No positive ID yet
By: moretivicar
2009-11-26 14:51:57 EST (-0500)

Thanks for the input guys.
I’ve still not managed to make a positive ID, but I’m hoping to get down that way again soon. I’ll record more information about the local environment this time, and also collect a sample.
I think there is an ash tree close by, so they probably are ash leaves in the picture.

Perenniporia fraxinea
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2009-11-05 02:56:12 EST (-0500)

is a species I have never seen myself, but the best idea I can come up with.

Not Hydnellum of course, they have brown spores, and would have visible spines at the stage of maturity anyway.
I was also thinking of Fomes fomentarius, but that species releases its spores in spring, not autumn.
It’s too thick and greyish to be Heterobasidion annosum.
So, there aren’t many left with that size and white spores to choose from. Isn’t there debris and leaves of ash in the pictures too?

Buried wood?
By: Nathan Wilson (nathan)
2009-10-27 12:07:18 EDT (-0400)

It might be a ‘conk’ of some sort, but that generally requires wood of some sort. It also might be a young Hydnellum (I think those have white spores).

Ganoderma has brown spores..
By: Irene Andersson (irenea)
2009-10-27 09:58:34 EDT (-0400)

Created: 2009-10-27 04:49:39 EDT (-0400)
Last modified: 2011-05-09 21:12:37 EDT (-0400)
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